2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/52074
Title:
Utah Beach
Authors:
Badsey, Stephen
Other Titles:
Battle Zone Normandy: Utah Beach
Abstract:
Unique among the D-Day landing beaches in its dangers, Utah Beach saw the US Army's greatest success, namely landing with the fewest casualties of any of the Allied invasion beaches The landing beach closest to Normandy’s largest port, Cherbourg, and regarded by the Germans as the most important Allied objective, Utah was isolated from the other D-Day beaches, meaning that that troops landing there would have to fight alone until a link-up could be achieved. Accordingly, the US First Army committed a powerful landing force, preceded by a night parachute and glider assault, part of the largest night drop ever mounted. Despite wide scattering, the airborne troops secured the critical communications centre of Ste Mere Eglise on D-Day, the first village in Normandy to be liberated. Supported by a devastating air and naval bombardment, although landing on the wrong beach in bad weather, 4th Infantry Division took only 197 casualties out of 23,000 troops that landed on D-Day, and by the early afternoon had begun to link up with the first of the paratroopers.
Publisher:
The History Press
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/52074
Additional Links:
http://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/Default.aspx?tabid=7613&ProductID=543
Type:
Book
Language:
en
ISBN:
978-0750930130
Appears in Collections:
Conflict Studies Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBadsey, Stephen-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-04T17:16:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-04T17:16:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.isbn978-0750930130-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/52074-
dc.description.abstractUnique among the D-Day landing beaches in its dangers, Utah Beach saw the US Army's greatest success, namely landing with the fewest casualties of any of the Allied invasion beaches The landing beach closest to Normandy’s largest port, Cherbourg, and regarded by the Germans as the most important Allied objective, Utah was isolated from the other D-Day beaches, meaning that that troops landing there would have to fight alone until a link-up could be achieved. Accordingly, the US First Army committed a powerful landing force, preceded by a night parachute and glider assault, part of the largest night drop ever mounted. Despite wide scattering, the airborne troops secured the critical communications centre of Ste Mere Eglise on D-Day, the first village in Normandy to be liberated. Supported by a devastating air and naval bombardment, although landing on the wrong beach in bad weather, 4th Infantry Division took only 197 casualties out of 23,000 troops that landed on D-Day, and by the early afternoon had begun to link up with the first of the paratroopers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe History Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/Default.aspx?tabid=7613&ProductID=543en
dc.subjectWar studiesen
dc.subjectWorld War Twoen
dc.subjectMilitary historyen
dc.subjectD-Day landingsen
dc.titleUtah Beachen
dc.title.alternativeBattle Zone Normandy: Utah Beach-
dc.typeBooken
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