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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > The validity of a non-differential global positioning system for assessing player movement patterns in field hockey.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/50593
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Title: The validity of a non-differential global positioning system for assessing player movement patterns in field hockey.
Authors: MacLeod, Hannah
Morris, John
Nevill, Alan M.
Sunderland, Caroline
Citation: Journal of Sports Sciences, 27(2): 121-128
Publisher: Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Journal: Journal of Sports Sciences
Issue Date: 2009
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/50593
DOI: 10.1080/02640410802422181
Additional Links: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/02640410802422181
Abstract: Nine games players (mean age 23.3 years, s¼2.8; height 1.73 m, s¼0.08; body mass 70.0 kg, s¼12.7) completed 14 laps of a measured circuit that incorporated intermittent running and directional changes, representative of the movements made by field hockey players during match-play. The distances and speeds recorded by a global positioning satellite (GPS) system (Spi EliteTM) were compared statistically with speed measurements made using timing gates and distances measured using a calibrated trundle wheel, to establish the criterion validity of the GPS system. A validation of the speed of movement of each participant separately was also made, using data from each timing gate, over a range of speeds. The mean distance recorded by the GPS system was 6821 m (s¼7) and the mean speed was 7.0 km h71 (s¼1.9), compared with the actual distance of 6818 m and recorded mean speed of 7.0 km h71 (s¼1.9). Pearson correlations (r) among timing gate speed and GPS speed were 0.99 (P50.001) and the mean difference and 95% limits of agreement were 0.0+0.9 km h71. These results suggest that a GPS system (Spi EliteTM) offers a valid tool for measuring speed and distance during match-play, and can quickly provide the
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Team sports
Performance analysis
Match analysis
Satellite positioning
Team games
Athletes
Field hockey
GPS
Sports
ISSN: 02640414
1466447X
Appears in Collections: Sport Performance
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

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