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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Development and initial validation of the Music Mood-Regulation Scale.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/48956
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Title: Development and initial validation of the Music Mood-Regulation Scale.
Authors: Hewston, Ruth M.
Lane, Andrew M.
Karag, Costas I.
Citation: E-journal of Applied Psychology, 4(1): 15-22.
Publisher: Melbourne, Australia: Swinburne University
Journal: E-journal of Applied Psychology
Issue Date: 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/48956
Additional Links: http://ojs.lib.swin.edu.au/index.php/ejap/article/view/130
Abstract: This study designed a measure to assess the perceived effectiveness of music as a strategy to regulate mood among a sport and exercise population. A strategy of assessing and comparing the integrity of competing hypotheses to explain the underlying factor structure of the scale was used. A 21-item Music Mood-Regulation Scale (MMRS) was developed to assess the extent to which participants used music to alter the mood states of anger, calmness, depression, fatigue, happiness, tension, and vigor. Volunteer sport and exercise participants (N = 1,279) rated the perceived effectiveness of music to regulate each MMRS item on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the integrity of four competing models, and results lend support to a correlated 7-factor structure for the MMRS (RCFI = .94; RMSEA = .06). Cronbach alpha coefficients were in the range of 0.74 – 0.88 thus demonstrating the internal reliability of scales. It is suggested that the MMRS shows promising degrees of validity. Future research should assess the extent to which individuals can develop the ability to use music as a strategy to regulate mood in situations in which disturbed mood might be detrimental to performance.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: This is an open access journal
Keywords: Music
Music Mood-Regulation Scale (MMRS)
Performance
Performance measurement
Mood
Self-efficacy
Self-perception
Self-regulation
Psychometrics
Sports psychology
ISSN: 1832-7931
Appears in Collections: Sport Performance

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