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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School for Education Futures > Centre for Developmental and Applied Research in Education (CeDARE) > Professional and Adult Learning > The Bar is Slightly Higher: the Perception of Racism in Teacher Education.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47573
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Title: The Bar is Slightly Higher: the Perception of Racism in Teacher Education.
Authors: Basit, Tehmina N.
McNamara, Olwen
Roberts, Lorna
Carrington, Bruce
Maguire, Meg
Woodrow, Derek
Citation: Cambridge Journal of Education, 37(2): 279-298.
Publisher: London: Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Journal: Cambridge Journal of Education
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47573
DOI: 10.1080/03057640701372616
Additional Links: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/03057640701372616
http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=209833761&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Abstract: The education and training of teachers is an issue of national concern. In this paper we analyse the findings of an in-depth investigation, undertaken by means of semi structured interviews, of a group of minority ethnic teacher trainees who withdrew from Initial Teacher Training courses in England, and a smaller group of those who completed these courses. We focus, in particular, on trainees' perception of the manifestation of racism during their training. Though none of the minority ethnic withdrawers perceive racism as the determining factor for their withdrawal, some mention instances of covert and even overt racism, while others note subtle forms of discriminatory obstacles to successful completion of the course, which they are reluctant to label as racism. The paper concludes by pointing to the complexity of categorizing phenomena as racism. It also draws attention, on the one hand, to the vulnerability of those who view themselves as being racially abused, and, on the other, to those who are disinclined to dwell on barriers to success as forms of racism and are more predisposed to regarding them as failures of the system.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Teacher education
Education
Racism
Minority ethnic groups
England
UK
ISSN: 0305764X
14693577
Appears in Collections: Professional and Adult Learning

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