Student drop-out: an investigation into reasons for students leaving Bioscience programmes in one new university, over a period of five years.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47531
Title:
Student drop-out: an investigation into reasons for students leaving Bioscience programmes in one new university, over a period of five years.
Authors:
Allan, Joanna; Bentley, Hilary
Abstract:
The impetus for supporting the development of students’ learning in higher education (HE) comes as a result of the impact of a range of factors affecting the profile of undergraduate students world-wide. In the UK, the widening participation agenda is a key driver that is predicated on the premise that ‘we cannot afford to waste talent simply because of a reluctance to foster it’ (HEFCE, 2006: 9). In seeking to address the discrepancies in the participation rates between different social classes, universities in the UK are offering fair access to HE to disabled students, mature students and men and women from all ethnic backgrounds. Modern universities (founded post- 1992) especially have found that large numbers of students now come from non-traditional backgrounds, and that there are difficulties associated with supporting and fostering learning where students’ prior educational experiences are very varied (Bamber and Tett, 2000; McInnis, 2001; Zeegers and Martin, 2001). There is little value for HE institutions in attracting students on to courses if they subsequently drop out of their studies, but the factors influencing attrition rates are both wide-ranging and complex.
Citation:
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning, 8(3): 40-46.
Publisher:
Stafford: Staffordshire University
Journal:
Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47531
Additional Links:
http://www.staffs.ac.uk/journal/voleightthree/resnotetwo.htm
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1466-6529
Appears in Collections:
Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAllan, Joanna-
dc.contributor.authorBentley, Hilary-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-15T15:19:26Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-15T15:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationWidening Participation and Lifelong Learning, 8(3): 40-46.en
dc.identifier.issn1466-6529-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/47531-
dc.description.abstractThe impetus for supporting the development of students’ learning in higher education (HE) comes as a result of the impact of a range of factors affecting the profile of undergraduate students world-wide. In the UK, the widening participation agenda is a key driver that is predicated on the premise that ‘we cannot afford to waste talent simply because of a reluctance to foster it’ (HEFCE, 2006: 9). In seeking to address the discrepancies in the participation rates between different social classes, universities in the UK are offering fair access to HE to disabled students, mature students and men and women from all ethnic backgrounds. Modern universities (founded post- 1992) especially have found that large numbers of students now come from non-traditional backgrounds, and that there are difficulties associated with supporting and fostering learning where students’ prior educational experiences are very varied (Bamber and Tett, 2000; McInnis, 2001; Zeegers and Martin, 2001). There is little value for HE institutions in attracting students on to courses if they subsequently drop out of their studies, but the factors influencing attrition rates are both wide-ranging and complex.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStafford: Staffordshire Universityen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.staffs.ac.uk/journal/voleightthree/resnotetwo.htmen
dc.subjectHigher educationen
dc.subjectWidening participationen
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.subjectDrop-outsen
dc.subjectNon-traditional studentsen
dc.subjectRetentionen
dc.subjectPost-1992 universitiesen
dc.titleStudent drop-out: an investigation into reasons for students leaving Bioscience programmes in one new university, over a period of five years.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalWidening Participation and Lifelong Learningen
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