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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School for Education Futures > Centre for Developmental and Applied Research in Education (CeDARE) > Learning and Teaching in Higher Education > Student drop-out: an investigation into reasons for students leaving Bioscience programmes in one new university, over a period of five years.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47531
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Title: Student drop-out: an investigation into reasons for students leaving Bioscience programmes in one new university, over a period of five years.
Authors: Allan, Joanna
Bentley, Hilary
Citation: Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning, 8(3): 40-46.
Publisher: Stafford: Staffordshire University
Journal: Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning
Issue Date: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47531
Additional Links: http://www.staffs.ac.uk/journal/voleightthree/resnotetwo.htm
Abstract: The impetus for supporting the development of students’ learning in higher education (HE) comes as a result of the impact of a range of factors affecting the profile of undergraduate students world-wide. In the UK, the widening participation agenda is a key driver that is predicated on the premise that ‘we cannot afford to waste talent simply because of a reluctance to foster it’ (HEFCE, 2006: 9). In seeking to address the discrepancies in the participation rates between different social classes, universities in the UK are offering fair access to HE to disabled students, mature students and men and women from all ethnic backgrounds. Modern universities (founded post- 1992) especially have found that large numbers of students now come from non-traditional backgrounds, and that there are difficulties associated with supporting and fostering learning where students’ prior educational experiences are very varied (Bamber and Tett, 2000; McInnis, 2001; Zeegers and Martin, 2001). There is little value for HE institutions in attracting students on to courses if they subsequently drop out of their studies, but the factors influencing attrition rates are both wide-ranging and complex.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Higher education
Widening participation
Undergraduate students
Learning
UK
Drop-outs
Non-traditional students
Retention
Post-1992 universities
ISSN: 1466-6529
Appears in Collections: Learning and Teaching in Higher Education

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