Of ‘duckers and divers’, mice and men: the impact of market fundamentalism in FE colleges post-incorporation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47391
Title:
Of ‘duckers and divers’, mice and men: the impact of market fundamentalism in FE colleges post-incorporation.
Authors:
Smith, Rob
Abstract:
This paper provides a critique of the current policy orthodoxy of using markets to organise and structure education provision in England, focusing in particular on Further Education (FE) provision. Starting from the context of New Labour's so-called Third Way, it sets out research findings that indicate that marketisation not only produces cultures that relate first and foremost to institutional self-interest but also may be detrimental to quality provision for students. Drawing on qualitative research, the paper explores the impact of quasi-marketisation, focusing on how one college 'successfully' negotiated the funding changes and the competitive context of the FE quasi-market. The paper concludes by looking at the findings through the theoretical lenses of some key concepts from Habermasian theory.
Citation:
Research in Post-Compulsory Education, 12(1): 53-69.
Publisher:
Routledge (Taylor & Francis).
Journal:
Research in Post-Compulsory Education
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47391
DOI:
10.1080/13596740601155397
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/13596740601155397; http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=207270920&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13596748; 17475112
Appears in Collections:
Critical Policy Studies in Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rob-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-14T21:01:48Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-14T21:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationResearch in Post-Compulsory Education, 12(1): 53-69.en
dc.identifier.issn13596748-
dc.identifier.issn17475112-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13596740601155397-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/47391-
dc.description.abstractThis paper provides a critique of the current policy orthodoxy of using markets to organise and structure education provision in England, focusing in particular on Further Education (FE) provision. Starting from the context of New Labour's so-called Third Way, it sets out research findings that indicate that marketisation not only produces cultures that relate first and foremost to institutional self-interest but also may be detrimental to quality provision for students. Drawing on qualitative research, the paper explores the impact of quasi-marketisation, focusing on how one college 'successfully' negotiated the funding changes and the competitive context of the FE quasi-market. The paper concludes by looking at the findings through the theoretical lenses of some key concepts from Habermasian theory.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis).en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/13596740601155397en
dc.relation.urlhttp://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=207270920&ETOC=RN&from=searchengineen
dc.subjectMarket fundamentalismen
dc.subjectFurther educationen
dc.subjectQuasi-marketisationen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectHabermasian theoryen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.titleOf ‘duckers and divers’, mice and men: the impact of market fundamentalism in FE colleges post-incorporation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Post-Compulsory Educationen
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.