2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47084
Title:
Whiteness and Racism in Post Colonial British Children's Literature in England
Authors:
Jowallah, Rohan
Abstract:
The issues of whiteness is absent from most contemporary debates in England. There is the claim by many leaders, that England has a diverse society. This paper seeks to explore issues of racism and whiteness in post colonial British texts, used within school and the home. Taxel (1992, p.8) suggest that, ‘…there is a selective tradition in children’s literature favoring the perspectives and world view of the dominant social group’. This paper utilizes the ‘Critical Race Theory’ and incorporates the tenets of ‘Critical Literacy’ to explore a child’s reading materials within the home and incorporates the Case Study research approach. In order to employ the critical literacy approach, three mini lessons were used to explore reading texts selected by a class teacher. Bourdieu’s (1992, p.18), work is also cited in this paper, as his theory of ‘habitus’ underpins the historical issues and ongoing social issues that can influence the readers and writers in the coding and decoding of texts. The findings revealed that critical literacy can be used to highlight issue of whiteness and racism; however, there are specific issues that need to be considered before using this approach within the home.
Citation:
The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations, 7(2): 135-142
Publisher:
Common Ground Publishing
Journal:
The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/47084
Additional Links:
http://ijd.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.29/prod.492
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1447-9532
Appears in Collections:
Education for Social Inclusion and Social Justice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJowallah, Rohan-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-06T15:29:13Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-06T15:29:13Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationThe International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations, 7(2): 135-142en
dc.identifier.issn1447-9532-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/47084-
dc.description.abstractThe issues of whiteness is absent from most contemporary debates in England. There is the claim by many leaders, that England has a diverse society. This paper seeks to explore issues of racism and whiteness in post colonial British texts, used within school and the home. Taxel (1992, p.8) suggest that, ‘…there is a selective tradition in children’s literature favoring the perspectives and world view of the dominant social group’. This paper utilizes the ‘Critical Race Theory’ and incorporates the tenets of ‘Critical Literacy’ to explore a child’s reading materials within the home and incorporates the Case Study research approach. In order to employ the critical literacy approach, three mini lessons were used to explore reading texts selected by a class teacher. Bourdieu’s (1992, p.18), work is also cited in this paper, as his theory of ‘habitus’ underpins the historical issues and ongoing social issues that can influence the readers and writers in the coding and decoding of texts. The findings revealed that critical literacy can be used to highlight issue of whiteness and racism; however, there are specific issues that need to be considered before using this approach within the home.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCommon Ground Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ijd.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.29/prod.492en
dc.subjectWhitenessen
dc.subjectRacismen
dc.subjectCritical Literacyen
dc.subjectDiversityen
dc.subjectSocial groupsen
dc.subjectChildren’s literatureen
dc.subjectCritical Race Theoryen
dc.subjectCRTen
dc.subjectBourdieuen
dc.titleWhiteness and Racism in Post Colonial British Children's Literature in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nationsen
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