Videogame Based Learning and the Problem of Gender Equity: Exemplifying an Androgynous Approach to Developing Computer Science E-Learning Games in Higher Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/41784
Title:
Videogame Based Learning and the Problem of Gender Equity: Exemplifying an Androgynous Approach to Developing Computer Science E-Learning Games in Higher Education
Authors:
Nte, Sol
Other Titles:
Proceedings of CGAMES’2008
Abstract:
Several authors have considered those virtual spaces in which videogames take place as being gendered and videogames themselves as gender specific (e.g. Jenkins, 1999; Subrahmanyam & Greenfield, 1994; Hartmann & Klimmt, 2006). Videogames are often considered to be an entry path into computer literacy for young people (Greenfield & Cocking, 1996; Kiesler et Al. 1985), if this is the case then to some degree first year undergraduate computer literacy is likely to be informed by videogame experiences. Videogames can be considered to be one of the most “engaging intellectual pastimes that we have invented” (Prensky, 2004) which suggests successful videogames as a useful model for developing sound E-Learning applications (Ebner & Holzinger 2007) . However since E-Learning must be careful to avoid gender bias in the presentation of learning resources, any adoption of a videogame development model must undergo a process of “ungendering” wherein game models are analysed in terms of gender equity and suitably corrected. An actively androgynous “games for gamers” not specific genders (Subrahmanyam & Greenfield, 1999) approach is proposed and exemplified to consider how the game developer can avoid producing learning games that have some form of gender bias in the degree to which they are effective. This paper examines the preparatory theoretical work in the development of a pilot study that employs an androgynous software approach to avoid those effects of gendering originating in videogames which can negatively affect games based E-Learning. The analysis is presented from a software development perspective and documents the theoretical considerations that led to the development of the “Class Solitaire” demo - a version of the popular “solitaire” videogame designed to teach java subclassing to first year undergraduates.
Citation:
In: Mehdi, Q., Moreton, R. and Slater, S. (eds), Proceedings of CGAMES’2008. 13th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Educational and Serious Games. Light House Media Centre, Wolverhampton, UK, 3-5 November 2008.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton, School of Computing and Information Technology
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/41784
Additional Links:
http://www.cgames.org/; http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=14750
Type:
Meetings & Proceedings
Language:
en
ISBN:
978-0-9549016-6-0
Appears in Collections:
Game Simulation and Artificial Intelligence Centre (GSAI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNte, Sol-
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-03T14:31:58Z-
dc.date.available2008-12-03T14:31:58Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Mehdi, Q., Moreton, R. and Slater, S. (eds), Proceedings of CGAMES’2008. 13th International Conference on Computer Games: AI, Animation, Mobile, Educational and Serious Games. Light House Media Centre, Wolverhampton, UK, 3-5 November 2008.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-9549016-6-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/41784-
dc.description.abstractSeveral authors have considered those virtual spaces in which videogames take place as being gendered and videogames themselves as gender specific (e.g. Jenkins, 1999; Subrahmanyam & Greenfield, 1994; Hartmann & Klimmt, 2006). Videogames are often considered to be an entry path into computer literacy for young people (Greenfield & Cocking, 1996; Kiesler et Al. 1985), if this is the case then to some degree first year undergraduate computer literacy is likely to be informed by videogame experiences. Videogames can be considered to be one of the most “engaging intellectual pastimes that we have invented” (Prensky, 2004) which suggests successful videogames as a useful model for developing sound E-Learning applications (Ebner & Holzinger 2007) . However since E-Learning must be careful to avoid gender bias in the presentation of learning resources, any adoption of a videogame development model must undergo a process of “ungendering” wherein game models are analysed in terms of gender equity and suitably corrected. An actively androgynous “games for gamers” not specific genders (Subrahmanyam & Greenfield, 1999) approach is proposed and exemplified to consider how the game developer can avoid producing learning games that have some form of gender bias in the degree to which they are effective. This paper examines the preparatory theoretical work in the development of a pilot study that employs an androgynous software approach to avoid those effects of gendering originating in videogames which can negatively affect games based E-Learning. The analysis is presented from a software development perspective and documents the theoretical considerations that led to the development of the “Class Solitaire” demo - a version of the popular “solitaire” videogame designed to teach java subclassing to first year undergraduates.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhampton, School of Computing and Information Technologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.cgames.org/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=14750en
dc.subjectGender equityen
dc.subjectE-learningen
dc.subjectGames based learningen
dc.subjectVideogameen
dc.subjectSoftware developmenten
dc.subjectComputer science teachingen
dc.subjectObject oriented programmingen
dc.titleVideogame Based Learning and the Problem of Gender Equity: Exemplifying an Androgynous Approach to Developing Computer Science E-Learning Games in Higher Educationen
dc.title.alternativeProceedings of CGAMES’2008en
dc.typeMeetings & Proceedingsen
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