2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/4007
Title:
Can the Web give useful information about commercial uses of scientific research?
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike
Abstract:
Invocations of pure and applied science journals in the Web were analysed, focussing on commercial sites, in order to assess whether the Web can yield useful information about university-industry knowledge transfer. On a macro level, evidence was found that applied research was more highly invoked on the non-academic Web than pure research, but only in one of the two fields studied. On a micro level, instances of clear evidence of the transfer of academic knowledge to a commercial setting were sparse. Science research on the Web seems to be invoked mainly for marketing purposes, although high technology companies can invoke published academic research as an organic part of a strategy to prove product effectiveness. It is conjectured that invoking academic research in business Web pages is rarely of clear commercial benefit to a company and that, except in unusual circumstances, benefits from research will be kept hidden to avoid giving intelligence to competitors.
Citation:
Online Information Review, 28(2): 116-126
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/4007
DOI:
10.1108/14684520410531655
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Review&contentId=1319882
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
14684527,00000000
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group ; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mike-
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-23T14:27:15Z-
dc.date.available2006-08-23T14:27:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationOnline Information Review, 28(2): 116-126en
dc.identifier.issn14684527,00000000-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/14684520410531655-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/4007-
dc.description.abstractInvocations of pure and applied science journals in the Web were analysed, focussing on commercial sites, in order to assess whether the Web can yield useful information about university-industry knowledge transfer. On a macro level, evidence was found that applied research was more highly invoked on the non-academic Web than pure research, but only in one of the two fields studied. On a micro level, instances of clear evidence of the transfer of academic knowledge to a commercial setting were sparse. Science research on the Web seems to be invoked mainly for marketing purposes, although high technology companies can invoke published academic research as an organic part of a strategy to prove product effectiveness. It is conjectured that invoking academic research in business Web pages is rarely of clear commercial benefit to a company and that, except in unusual circumstances, benefits from research will be kept hidden to avoid giving intelligence to competitors.en
dc.format.extent332704 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Review&contentId=1319882en
dc.subjectKnowledge managementen
dc.subjectMarketing intelligenceen
dc.subjectWorld Wide Weben
dc.subjectE-commerceen
dc.subjectScientific researchen
dc.titleCan the Web give useful information about commercial uses of scientific research?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-
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