Sexual dimorphism in the acute effects of secondhand smoke on thyroid hormone secretion, inflammatory markers and vascular function.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/39977
Title:
Sexual dimorphism in the acute effects of secondhand smoke on thyroid hormone secretion, inflammatory markers and vascular function.
Authors:
Flouris, Andreas D.; Metsios, Giorgos S.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis
Abstract:
Experimental evidence for the physiological effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) is limited, although it affects millions of people globally and its prevalence is increasing, despite currently adopted antismoking measures. Also, scarce evidence suggests that the effects of SHS may be more pronounced in men. We conducted a randomized single-blind crossover study to investigate the sex-specific SHS effects in a controlled simulated bar/restaurant environment on gonadal and thyroid hormones, inflammatory cytokines, and vascular function. Twenty-eight (women = 14) nonsmoking adults underwent a 1-h exposure to moderate SHS and a 1-h control trial. Serum and urine cotinine, gonadal and thyroid hormones, inflammatory cytokines, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were assessed before exposure and immediately after in both trials. Results showed that testosterone (P = 0.019) and progesterone (P < 0.001) in men and 17beta-estradiol (P = 0.001) and progesterone (P < 0.001) in women were significantly decreased after SHS. In men, SHS was accompanied by increased free thyroxine (P < 0.001), triiodothyronine (P = 0.020), and decreased the triiodothyronine-to-free thyroxine ratio (P = 0.033). In women, significant SHS-induced change was observed only in free thyroxine (P = 0.010), with considerable sex variation in free thyroxine and triiodothyronine and a decrease in luteinizing hormone (P = 0.026) and follicle-stimulating hormone (P < 0.001). After SHS, IL-1beta (P = 0.001) and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.040) were increased in men but not women. We concluded that a 1-h SHS exposure at bar/restaurant levels is accompanied by decrements in gonadal hormones in both sexes and marked increases in thyroid hormone secretion, IL-1beta production, and systolic blood pressure in men.
Citation:
American Journal of Physiology, 294(2): E456-462
Publisher:
American Physiological Society
Journal:
American Journal of Physiology
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/39977
DOI:
10.1152/ajpendo.00699.2007
PubMed ID:
18073318
Additional Links:
http://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/294/2/E456
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0193-1849
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlouris, Andreas D.-
dc.contributor.authorMetsios, Giorgos S.-
dc.contributor.authorJamurtas, Athanasios Z.-
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannis-
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-30T22:36:17Z-
dc.date.available2008-10-30T22:36:17Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Physiology, 294(2): E456-462en
dc.identifier.issn0193-1849-
dc.identifier.pmid18073318-
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/ajpendo.00699.2007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/39977-
dc.description.abstractExperimental evidence for the physiological effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) is limited, although it affects millions of people globally and its prevalence is increasing, despite currently adopted antismoking measures. Also, scarce evidence suggests that the effects of SHS may be more pronounced in men. We conducted a randomized single-blind crossover study to investigate the sex-specific SHS effects in a controlled simulated bar/restaurant environment on gonadal and thyroid hormones, inflammatory cytokines, and vascular function. Twenty-eight (women = 14) nonsmoking adults underwent a 1-h exposure to moderate SHS and a 1-h control trial. Serum and urine cotinine, gonadal and thyroid hormones, inflammatory cytokines, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were assessed before exposure and immediately after in both trials. Results showed that testosterone (P = 0.019) and progesterone (P < 0.001) in men and 17beta-estradiol (P = 0.001) and progesterone (P < 0.001) in women were significantly decreased after SHS. In men, SHS was accompanied by increased free thyroxine (P < 0.001), triiodothyronine (P = 0.020), and decreased the triiodothyronine-to-free thyroxine ratio (P = 0.033). In women, significant SHS-induced change was observed only in free thyroxine (P = 0.010), with considerable sex variation in free thyroxine and triiodothyronine and a decrease in luteinizing hormone (P = 0.026) and follicle-stimulating hormone (P < 0.001). After SHS, IL-1beta (P = 0.001) and systolic blood pressure (P = 0.040) were increased in men but not women. We concluded that a 1-h SHS exposure at bar/restaurant levels is accompanied by decrements in gonadal hormones in both sexes and marked increases in thyroid hormone secretion, IL-1beta production, and systolic blood pressure in men.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajpendo.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/294/2/E456en
dc.subjectEnvironmental Tobacco Smokeen
dc.subjectEstrogenen
dc.subjectCytokinesen
dc.subjectCigarette smoking-
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Systemen
dc.subject.meshCotinineen
dc.subject.meshCross-Over Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEstradiolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollicle Stimulating Hormoneen
dc.subject.meshHeart Rateen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunityen
dc.subject.meshInflammation Mediatorsen
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-1betaen
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-6en
dc.subject.meshLuteinizing Hormoneen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen
dc.subject.meshSingle-Blind Methoden
dc.subject.meshTestosteroneen
dc.subject.meshThyroid Hormonesen
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollutionen
dc.subject.meshTumor Necrosis Factor-alphaen
dc.titleSexual dimorphism in the acute effects of secondhand smoke on thyroid hormone secretion, inflammatory markers and vascular function.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Physiologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.