2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/39975
Title:
Contribution of muscular strength in cardiorespiratory fitness tests.
Authors:
Flouris, Andreas D.; Metsios, Giorgos S.; Koutedakis, Yiannis
Abstract:
Reports from laboratory-based studies have revealed a relationship between resistance training and endurance performance in both trained and untrained individuals. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of lower extremity muscular strength levels in performing cardiorespiratory fitness tests in laboratory, as well as field-based settings. Within 2 weeks 38 healthy males (age 21.6±2.5 years, body mass index-BMI-24.4±2.2) performed three maximal oxygen uptake (VO^sub 2max^) assessments using the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MSR), the 20 m square shuttle run test (SSR), and a maximal treadmill test (MT) to exhaustion. Data were also obtained from knee flexion and extension isokinetic dynamometry at 60^sub °0·s-1^. MSR performance correlated with the peak torque generated from both legs at r=0.63 (P<0.001 ). The equivalent for SSR was significant at r=0.44 (P<0.05), while MT demonstrated a non-significant positive correlation coefficient (r=0.34, P>0.05). Stepwise regression analyses revealed that the inclusion of leg strength parameters increased the coefficient of determination by 9% (P<0.001) and 4% (P<0.05) in the MSR and SSR, respectively. The MT model was not significantly associated with any of the isokinetic indices studied. Although moderately significant, the present coefficients suggest that performance in the present field-based cardiorespiratory fitness tasks is affected to a certain extent by lower extremity muscular strength. The latter also demonstrates a positive relationship with laboratory-based performance.
Citation:
The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 46(2):197-201
Publisher:
Edizioni Minerva Medica
Journal:
The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/39975
PubMed ID:
16823347
Additional Links:
http://www.minervamedica.it/index2.t; http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1117329511&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=53702&RQT=309&VName=PQD
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0022-4707
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlouris, Andreas D.-
dc.contributor.authorMetsios, Giorgos S.-
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannis-
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-30T22:33:29Z-
dc.date.available2008-10-30T22:33:29Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 46(2):197-201en
dc.identifier.issn0022-4707-
dc.identifier.pmid16823347-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/39975-
dc.description.abstractReports from laboratory-based studies have revealed a relationship between resistance training and endurance performance in both trained and untrained individuals. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of lower extremity muscular strength levels in performing cardiorespiratory fitness tests in laboratory, as well as field-based settings. Within 2 weeks 38 healthy males (age 21.6±2.5 years, body mass index-BMI-24.4±2.2) performed three maximal oxygen uptake (VO^sub 2max^) assessments using the 20 m multistage shuttle run test (MSR), the 20 m square shuttle run test (SSR), and a maximal treadmill test (MT) to exhaustion. Data were also obtained from knee flexion and extension isokinetic dynamometry at 60^sub °0·s-1^. MSR performance correlated with the peak torque generated from both legs at r=0.63 (P<0.001 ). The equivalent for SSR was significant at r=0.44 (P<0.05), while MT demonstrated a non-significant positive correlation coefficient (r=0.34, P>0.05). Stepwise regression analyses revealed that the inclusion of leg strength parameters increased the coefficient of determination by 9% (P<0.001) and 4% (P<0.05) in the MSR and SSR, respectively. The MT model was not significantly associated with any of the isokinetic indices studied. Although moderately significant, the present coefficients suggest that performance in the present field-based cardiorespiratory fitness tasks is affected to a certain extent by lower extremity muscular strength. The latter also demonstrates a positive relationship with laboratory-based performance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEdizioni Minerva Medicaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.minervamedica.it/index2.ten
dc.relation.urlhttp://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1117329511&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=53702&RQT=309&VName=PQDen
dc.subjectSports Medicineen
dc.subjectMuscular systemen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshExercise Testen
dc.subject.meshHearten
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshKneeen
dc.subject.meshLower Extremityen
dc.subject.meshLungen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMuscle Contractionen
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strengthen
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strength Dynamometeren
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Enduranceen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitnessen
dc.subject.meshRunningen
dc.subject.meshTorqueen
dc.titleContribution of muscular strength in cardiorespiratory fitness tests.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitnessen

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