2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/38795
Title:
Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves
Authors:
Arnott, Steve
Abstract:
This animation seeks to challenge traditional themes of narrative structure through the use of digital media. The resulting piece works on a number of levels and is accessible to a wide audience. It maintains the essence of toy theatre whilst being aware of current media practice, software and techniques. The visuals are influenced by 19th Century designs and rendered in three-dimensional effect with depth and lighting. Maintaining the story within the frame of the traditional toy theatre; Arnott’s research continues this traditional form of storytelling in current media form for the modern child. This research concerns the transposition of 18/19th century toy theatre storytelling into digital animations, keeping true to the original form and aesthetic which enabled rich imaginative play through effective staging of stories. The project was proposed to Pollock’s Toy Museum; production developed through meetings, collaboration and detailed research. The work reflects traditional aspects of toy theatre but is designed to appeal to a ‘media savvy’ public. It is a synthesis of ancient and modern methods of storytelling and production values
Citation:
In: Pollock’s Toy Museum
Publisher:
London: Pollock’s Toy Theatres Ltd
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/38795
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16113
Type:
Animation
Language:
en
Description:
The text is adapted from the 1836 version of John Kilby Green (1790 -1860) – the action is set in Medieval Baghdad and closely mirrors present day events in that city. Arnott worked closely with Edmond Fawdry, Director of Pollock’s Toy Museum and Paul J. Weighell, Curator of Collections. The Victoria and Albert Museum have acquired the work for the permanent theatre collection.
Appears in Collections:
Art, Design and Creative Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArnott, Steve-
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-09T11:04:25Z-
dc.date.available2008-10-09T11:04:25Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Pollock’s Toy Museumen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/38795-
dc.descriptionThe text is adapted from the 1836 version of John Kilby Green (1790 -1860) – the action is set in Medieval Baghdad and closely mirrors present day events in that city. Arnott worked closely with Edmond Fawdry, Director of Pollock’s Toy Museum and Paul J. Weighell, Curator of Collections. The Victoria and Albert Museum have acquired the work for the permanent theatre collection.en
dc.description.abstractThis animation seeks to challenge traditional themes of narrative structure through the use of digital media. The resulting piece works on a number of levels and is accessible to a wide audience. It maintains the essence of toy theatre whilst being aware of current media practice, software and techniques. The visuals are influenced by 19th Century designs and rendered in three-dimensional effect with depth and lighting. Maintaining the story within the frame of the traditional toy theatre; Arnott’s research continues this traditional form of storytelling in current media form for the modern child. This research concerns the transposition of 18/19th century toy theatre storytelling into digital animations, keeping true to the original form and aesthetic which enabled rich imaginative play through effective staging of stories. The project was proposed to Pollock’s Toy Museum; production developed through meetings, collaboration and detailed research. The work reflects traditional aspects of toy theatre but is designed to appeal to a ‘media savvy’ public. It is a synthesis of ancient and modern methods of storytelling and production valuesen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLondon: Pollock’s Toy Theatres Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16113en
dc.titleAli Baba and the Forty Thievesen
dc.typeAnimationen
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