2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/38733
Title:
Synaesthesia & Sound
Authors:
Moore, Samantha; Ward, Jamie
Abstract:
The creators collaborated to produce a short animated film documenting synaesthesiac sufferers' responses to specific orchestral sounds. It was the artists intent to contribute (through a mix of documentary animation and rigorous process) to the public understanding and knowledge about how synaesthesia operates and how it relates to the type of multi-sensory processing that we all engage in. The project set out to ascertain whether animations derived from synaesthetic combinations of sound and vision are rated as more aesthetically pleasing than animations in which sound and vision are combined arbitrarily, and therefore appeal to this ‘instinctive’ enjoyment of light, colour and music. The intention was to offer an arts-based perspective on the science of neuro-psychology, exploring the barriers between disciplines and media to be broken down. Moore recorded detailed descriptions of the subjects’ synaesthetic experiences to a range of sounds, which provided the basis for the animation. Once this visual vocabulary was generated the artist focused on the generation of a short film for a general audience; the scientist then used the film to test the public perception and understanding of synaesthesia.
Citation:
In: Dana Centre, London, May 2006
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/38733
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16108
Type:
Animation
Language:
en
Description:
The research culminated in a lecture/presentation at the Dana Centre in London (May 2006). The project was funded by a Wellcome Trust Sciart - Research and Development award.
Appears in Collections:
Art, Design and Creative Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Samantha-
dc.contributor.authorWard, Jamie-
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-08T10:01:22Z-
dc.date.available2008-10-08T10:01:22Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Dana Centre, London, May 2006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/38733-
dc.descriptionThe research culminated in a lecture/presentation at the Dana Centre in London (May 2006). The project was funded by a Wellcome Trust Sciart - Research and Development award.en
dc.description.abstractThe creators collaborated to produce a short animated film documenting synaesthesiac sufferers' responses to specific orchestral sounds. It was the artists intent to contribute (through a mix of documentary animation and rigorous process) to the public understanding and knowledge about how synaesthesia operates and how it relates to the type of multi-sensory processing that we all engage in. The project set out to ascertain whether animations derived from synaesthetic combinations of sound and vision are rated as more aesthetically pleasing than animations in which sound and vision are combined arbitrarily, and therefore appeal to this ‘instinctive’ enjoyment of light, colour and music. The intention was to offer an arts-based perspective on the science of neuro-psychology, exploring the barriers between disciplines and media to be broken down. Moore recorded detailed descriptions of the subjects’ synaesthetic experiences to a range of sounds, which provided the basis for the animation. Once this visual vocabulary was generated the artist focused on the generation of a short film for a general audience; the scientist then used the film to test the public perception and understanding of synaesthesia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16108en
dc.titleSynaesthesia & Sounden
dc.typeAnimationen
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.