2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/3764
Title:
Improving the attention students pay to, and the extent to which they act upon feedback.
Authors:
Davies, Jenny; Wrighton, Naomi
Abstract:
That learning is a cyclical process and that assessment drives learning are established facts. It is essential that an assessment regime considers not only what a student should know but also their approach to their learning. If students are required to evaluate, for instance, the ethical implications of IT, then it is not appropriate to use an assessment instrument that simply asks for regurgitation of information. In order to improve future performances, feedback on work presented by a knowledgeable other person, whether tutor, placement supervisor or peer, is essential.2 Staff perceive that feedback prompts student discussion of their work, enables understanding and improves learning. The aims of this project were to improve the efficacy of the feedback process and the quality of assessment feedback in the School of Computing and Information Technology (SCIT). This was through the implementation of a range of steps, based on those proposed by Gibbs during the University of Wolverhampton Campaign on Assessment 2002/03).
Citation:
CELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2003/04
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/3764
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
Report of a CELT project on supporting students through innovation and research
ISBN:
0954211642
Appears in Collections:
Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Jenny-
dc.contributor.authorWrighton, Naomi-
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-08T12:15:14Z-
dc.date.available2006-08-08T12:15:14Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2003/04en
dc.identifier.isbn0954211642-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/3764-
dc.descriptionReport of a CELT project on supporting students through innovation and researchen
dc.description.abstractThat learning is a cyclical process and that assessment drives learning are established facts. It is essential that an assessment regime considers not only what a student should know but also their approach to their learning. If students are required to evaluate, for instance, the ethical implications of IT, then it is not appropriate to use an assessment instrument that simply asks for regurgitation of information. In order to improve future performances, feedback on work presented by a knowledgeable other person, whether tutor, placement supervisor or peer, is essential.2 Staff perceive that feedback prompts student discussion of their work, enables understanding and improves learning. The aims of this project were to improve the efficacy of the feedback process and the quality of assessment feedback in the School of Computing and Information Technology (SCIT). This was through the implementation of a range of steps, based on those proposed by Gibbs during the University of Wolverhampton Campaign on Assessment 2002/03).en
dc.format.extent104370 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celten
dc.subjectAssessmenten
dc.subjectFeedbacken
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectHigher educationen
dc.subjectStudents-
dc.subjectComputer-based assessment-
dc.titleImproving the attention students pay to, and the extent to which they act upon feedback.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
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