2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/3666
Title:
Self-efficacy and degree choice among sports coaching and physical education students
Authors:
Horrell, Andrew; Lane, Andrew M.; O'Leary, Nick; Barber, Alison
Abstract:
This study investigates self-efficacy perceptions among Level 1 Sports students and Level 1 Physical Education (P.E.) students. Consistent with previous research (Bandura, 1997), we hypothesised that self-efficacy would be associated with course selection, and that efficacy expectations would be associated with performance accomplishments. An outcome of the present study is to aid module development in P.E. and coaching modules, and thereby enhance the student experience by improving the quality of provision. Further, we suggest that findings from the study could also help identify competencies that incoming students should seek to acquire, and therefore, could help develop guidelines to appropriately market the different degree pathways.
Citation:
CELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2003/04
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/3666
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
Report of a CELT project on supporting students through innovation and research
ISBN:
0954211642
Appears in Collections:
Institute for Learning Enhancement (ILE); Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHorrell, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorLane, Andrew M.-
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Nick-
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Alison-
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-02T10:51:31Z-
dc.date.available2006-08-02T10:51:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2003/04en
dc.identifier.isbn0954211642-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/3666-
dc.descriptionReport of a CELT project on supporting students through innovation and researchen
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates self-efficacy perceptions among Level 1 Sports students and Level 1 Physical Education (P.E.) students. Consistent with previous research (Bandura, 1997), we hypothesised that self-efficacy would be associated with course selection, and that efficacy expectations would be associated with performance accomplishments. An outcome of the present study is to aid module development in P.E. and coaching modules, and thereby enhance the student experience by improving the quality of provision. Further, we suggest that findings from the study could also help identify competencies that incoming students should seek to acquire, and therefore, could help develop guidelines to appropriately market the different degree pathways.en
dc.format.extent111306 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celten
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen
dc.subjectPhysical educationen
dc.subjectSports coachingen
dc.subjectUndergraduate studentsen
dc.subjectDegree choiceen
dc.subjectCourse selectionen
dc.subjectStudents-
dc.titleSelf-efficacy and degree choice among sports coaching and physical education studentsen
dc.typeBook chapteren
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