2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/35254
Title:
Allometric scaling of uphill cycling performance
Authors:
Jobson, Simon A.; Woodside, J.; Passfield, L.; Nevill, Alan M.
Abstract:
Previous laboratory-based investigations have identified optimal body mass scaling exponents in the range 0.79 - 0.91 for uphill cycling. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether or not these exponents are also valid in a field setting. A proportional allometric model was used to predict the optimal power-to-mass ratios associated with road-based uphill time-trial cycling performance. The optimal power function models predicting mean cycle speed during a 5.3 km, 5.4 % road hill-climb time-trial were (V O (2max) . m (-1.24)) (0.55) and (RMP (max) . m (-1.04)) (0.54), explained variance being 84.6 % and 70.5 %, respectively. Slightly higher mass exponents were observed when the mass predictor was replaced with the combined mass of cyclist and equipment (m (C)). Uphill cycling speed was proportional to (V O (2max) . m (C)(-1.33)) (0.57) and (RMP (max) . m (C)(-1.10)) (0.59). The curvilinear exponents, 0.54 - 0.59, identified a relatively strong curvilinear relationship between cycling speed and energy cost, suggesting that air resistance remains influential when cycling up a gradient of 5.4 %. These results provide some support for previously reported uphill cycling mass exponents derived in laboratories. However, the exponents reported here were a little higher than those reported previously, a finding possibly explained by a lack of geometric similarity in this sample.
Citation:
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 29(9): 753-757
Publisher:
Georg Thieme Verlag
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/35254
DOI:
10.1055/s-2007-989441
PubMed ID:
18213539
Additional Links:
http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-989441
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0172-4622
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Sport Performance; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJobson, Simon A.-
dc.contributor.authorWoodside, J.-
dc.contributor.authorPassfield, L.-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-13T09:53:05Z-
dc.date.available2008-08-13T09:53:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sports Medicine, 29(9): 753-757en
dc.identifier.issn0172-4622-
dc.identifier.pmid18213539-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-2007-989441-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/35254-
dc.description.abstractPrevious laboratory-based investigations have identified optimal body mass scaling exponents in the range 0.79 - 0.91 for uphill cycling. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether or not these exponents are also valid in a field setting. A proportional allometric model was used to predict the optimal power-to-mass ratios associated with road-based uphill time-trial cycling performance. The optimal power function models predicting mean cycle speed during a 5.3 km, 5.4 % road hill-climb time-trial were (V O (2max) . m (-1.24)) (0.55) and (RMP (max) . m (-1.04)) (0.54), explained variance being 84.6 % and 70.5 %, respectively. Slightly higher mass exponents were observed when the mass predictor was replaced with the combined mass of cyclist and equipment (m (C)). Uphill cycling speed was proportional to (V O (2max) . m (C)(-1.33)) (0.57) and (RMP (max) . m (C)(-1.10)) (0.59). The curvilinear exponents, 0.54 - 0.59, identified a relatively strong curvilinear relationship between cycling speed and energy cost, suggesting that air resistance remains influential when cycling up a gradient of 5.4 %. These results provide some support for previously reported uphill cycling mass exponents derived in laboratories. However, the exponents reported here were a little higher than those reported previously, a finding possibly explained by a lack of geometric similarity in this sample.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-989441en
dc.subjectAllometric modellingen
dc.subjectBody Sizeen
dc.subjectRoad cyclingen
dc.subjectOxygen uptakeen
dc.subjectRoad cyclingen
dc.subjectPower outputen
dc.subjectCycling-
dc.titleAllometric scaling of uphill cycling performanceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Medicineen
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