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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Art & Design > Centre for Art, Design, Research and Experimentation (CADRE) > Art, Design and Creative Technology > 3D Archaeological Reconstruction and Visualisation: An Artificial Life Model for Determining Vegetation Dispersal Patterns in Ancient Landscapes

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/34552
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Title: 3D Archaeological Reconstruction and Visualisation: An Artificial Life Model for Determining Vegetation Dispersal Patterns in Ancient Landscapes
Other Titles: IEEE Computer Society (2006) Proceedings
Authors: Ch'ng, Eugene
Stone, Robert J.
Citation: In: IEEE Computer Society Proceedings: Computer Graphics, Imaging and Vision, CGiV'06: July 25, 2006, Sydney, Australia, pp. 25-28.
Publisher: IEEE
Issue Date: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/34552
DOI: 10.1109/CGIV.2006.2
Additional Links: http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16123
http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/CGIV.2006.2
Abstract: This paper describes a methodology and software engine for generating dynamic vegetation models for archaeological reconstruction and interactive visualisation, integrating the disciplines of Artificial Life (Alife) and Virtual Reality. The engine, based on the concept of emergence (a phenomenon in complex Alife systems), uses real botanical parameters, channelled through simple rules, in order to synthesise the dispersal patterns of natural vegetation communities as they grow, reproduce, and compete for resources. The foci for the development and evaluation of the Alife engine described relate to different scenarios in nature as may have existed during the Mesolithic period. Results from the study showed evidence of correlations between the artificial vegetation and their natural counterparts, demonstrating the feasibility of using such models in historical landscape reconstructions.
Type: Meetings & Proceedings
Language: en
Description: Continuing work on the integration of Artificial Life and Virtual Reality tools to visualize the submerged Shotton River, Ch’ng and Stone developed an engine, based on the concept of emergence (a phenomenon in complex alife systems). Using real botanical parameters, channelled through simple rules it was possible to synthesise the dispersal patterns of natural vegetation communities. The focus in this paper was on modelling growth, reproduction, and competition for resources. Correlations between the artificial vegetation and natural counterparts, would demonstrate the feasibility of using such models in historical landscape reconstructions.
Keywords: Archaeological reconstruction
Interactive visualisation
Artificial Life
Virtual Reality
Vegetation dispersal patterns
Ancient landscapes
ISBN: 0-7695-2606-3
Appears in Collections: Art, Design and Creative Technology

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