3D Archaeological Reconstruction and Visualisation: An Artificial Life Model for Determining Vegetation Dispersal Patterns in Ancient Landscapes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/34552
Title:
3D Archaeological Reconstruction and Visualisation: An Artificial Life Model for Determining Vegetation Dispersal Patterns in Ancient Landscapes
Authors:
Ch'ng, Eugene; Stone, Robert J.
Other Titles:
IEEE Computer Society (2006) Proceedings
Abstract:
This paper describes a methodology and software engine for generating dynamic vegetation models for archaeological reconstruction and interactive visualisation, integrating the disciplines of Artificial Life (Alife) and Virtual Reality. The engine, based on the concept of emergence (a phenomenon in complex Alife systems), uses real botanical parameters, channelled through simple rules, in order to synthesise the dispersal patterns of natural vegetation communities as they grow, reproduce, and compete for resources. The foci for the development and evaluation of the Alife engine described relate to different scenarios in nature as may have existed during the Mesolithic period. Results from the study showed evidence of correlations between the artificial vegetation and their natural counterparts, demonstrating the feasibility of using such models in historical landscape reconstructions.
Citation:
In: IEEE Computer Society Proceedings: Computer Graphics, Imaging and Vision, CGiV'06: July 25, 2006, Sydney, Australia, pp. 25-28.
Publisher:
IEEE
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/34552
DOI:
10.1109/CGIV.2006.2
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16123; http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/CGIV.2006.2
Type:
Meetings & Proceedings
Language:
en
Description:
Continuing work on the integration of Artificial Life and Virtual Reality tools to visualize the submerged Shotton River, Ch’ng and Stone developed an engine, based on the concept of emergence (a phenomenon in complex alife systems). Using real botanical parameters, channelled through simple rules it was possible to synthesise the dispersal patterns of natural vegetation communities. The focus in this paper was on modelling growth, reproduction, and competition for resources. Correlations between the artificial vegetation and natural counterparts, would demonstrate the feasibility of using such models in historical landscape reconstructions.
ISBN:
0-7695-2606-3
Appears in Collections:
Art, Design and Creative Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCh'ng, Eugene-
dc.contributor.authorStone, Robert J.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-06T13:07:01Z-
dc.date.available2008-08-06T13:07:01Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationIn: IEEE Computer Society Proceedings: Computer Graphics, Imaging and Vision, CGiV'06: July 25, 2006, Sydney, Australia, pp. 25-28.en
dc.identifier.isbn0-7695-2606-3-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/CGIV.2006.2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/34552-
dc.descriptionContinuing work on the integration of Artificial Life and Virtual Reality tools to visualize the submerged Shotton River, Ch’ng and Stone developed an engine, based on the concept of emergence (a phenomenon in complex alife systems). Using real botanical parameters, channelled through simple rules it was possible to synthesise the dispersal patterns of natural vegetation communities. The focus in this paper was on modelling growth, reproduction, and competition for resources. Correlations between the artificial vegetation and natural counterparts, would demonstrate the feasibility of using such models in historical landscape reconstructions.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes a methodology and software engine for generating dynamic vegetation models for archaeological reconstruction and interactive visualisation, integrating the disciplines of Artificial Life (Alife) and Virtual Reality. The engine, based on the concept of emergence (a phenomenon in complex Alife systems), uses real botanical parameters, channelled through simple rules, in order to synthesise the dispersal patterns of natural vegetation communities as they grow, reproduce, and compete for resources. The foci for the development and evaluation of the Alife engine described relate to different scenarios in nature as may have existed during the Mesolithic period. Results from the study showed evidence of correlations between the artificial vegetation and their natural counterparts, demonstrating the feasibility of using such models in historical landscape reconstructions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIEEEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16123en
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/CGIV.2006.2en
dc.subjectArchaeological reconstructionen
dc.subjectInteractive visualisationen
dc.subjectArtificial Lifeen
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen
dc.subjectVegetation dispersal patternsen
dc.subjectAncient landscapesen
dc.title3D Archaeological Reconstruction and Visualisation: An Artificial Life Model for Determining Vegetation Dispersal Patterns in Ancient Landscapesen
dc.title.alternativeIEEE Computer Society (2006) Proceedingsen
dc.typeMeetings & Proceedingsen
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