Enhancing Virtual Reality with Artificial Life: Reconstructing a Flooded European Mesolithic Landscape

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/34532
Title:
Enhancing Virtual Reality with Artificial Life: Reconstructing a Flooded European Mesolithic Landscape
Authors:
Ch'ng, Eugene; Stone, Robert J.
Abstract:
The fusion of Virtual Reality and Artificial Life technologies has opened up a valuable and effective technique for research in the field of dynamic archaeological reconstruction. This paper describes early evaluations of simulated vegetation and environmental models using decentralized Artificial Life entities. The results demonstrate a strong feasibility for the application of integrated VR and Artificial Life in solving a 10,000 year old mystery shrouding a submerged landscape in the Southern North Sea, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. Three experimental scenarios with dynamic, “artificial” vegetation are observed to grow, reproduce, and react to virtual environmental parameters in a way that mimics their physical counterparts. Through further experimentation and refinement of the Artificial Life rules, plus the integration of additional knowledge from subject matter experts in related scientific fields, a credible reconstruction of the ancient and, today, inaccessible landscape may be within our reach.
Citation:
Enhancing Virtual Reality with Artificial Life: Reconstructing a Flooded European Mesolithic Landscape. Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 15(3): 341-352.
Publisher:
MIT Press
Journal:
Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/34532
DOI:
10.1162/pres.15.3.341
Additional Links:
http://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16122; http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/pres.15.3.341
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Earlier research to visualise the submerged Shotton River by Ch’ng, Arvanitis and Stone (2004) provide a foundation for the realisation that the manual placement of plants based on geo-archaeology and paleobotany did not represent an accurate reconstruction. This paper extended previous work using VR visualisation, adding artificial life software to simulate the growth of ‘virtual’ vegetation. The relationship with the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity at the University of Birmingham continued.
ISSN:
1054-7460; 1531-3263
Appears in Collections:
Art, Design and Creative Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCh'ng, Eugene-
dc.contributor.authorStone, Robert J.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-06T12:49:28Z-
dc.date.available2008-08-06T12:49:28Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationEnhancing Virtual Reality with Artificial Life: Reconstructing a Flooded European Mesolithic Landscape. Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 15(3): 341-352.en
dc.identifier.issn1054-7460-
dc.identifier.issn1531-3263-
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/pres.15.3.341-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/34532-
dc.descriptionEarlier research to visualise the submerged Shotton River by Ch’ng, Arvanitis and Stone (2004) provide a foundation for the realisation that the manual placement of plants based on geo-archaeology and paleobotany did not represent an accurate reconstruction. This paper extended previous work using VR visualisation, adding artificial life software to simulate the growth of ‘virtual’ vegetation. The relationship with the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity at the University of Birmingham continued.-
dc.description.abstractThe fusion of Virtual Reality and Artificial Life technologies has opened up a valuable and effective technique for research in the field of dynamic archaeological reconstruction. This paper describes early evaluations of simulated vegetation and environmental models using decentralized Artificial Life entities. The results demonstrate a strong feasibility for the application of integrated VR and Artificial Life in solving a 10,000 year old mystery shrouding a submerged landscape in the Southern North Sea, off the east coast of the United Kingdom. Three experimental scenarios with dynamic, “artificial” vegetation are observed to grow, reproduce, and react to virtual environmental parameters in a way that mimics their physical counterparts. Through further experimentation and refinement of the Artificial Life rules, plus the integration of additional knowledge from subject matter experts in related scientific fields, a credible reconstruction of the ancient and, today, inaccessible landscape may be within our reach.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMIT Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16122en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/pres.15.3.341en
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen
dc.subjectArtificial Lifeen
dc.subjectArchaeological reconstructionen
dc.titleEnhancing Virtual Reality with Artificial Life: Reconstructing a Flooded European Mesolithic Landscapeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPresence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environmentsen
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