3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/315227
Title:
Soil Erosion and Conservation in Brazil
Authors:
Fullen, Michael A.; Guerra, Antonio J. T.; Jorge, Maria do Carmo Oliveira; Alexandre, Silvia Teixeira
Abstract:
Brazil covers 8,547,403 km2 and is divided into five regions (Northern, North Western, Central Western, South Eastern and Southern). The diversity of climate, geology, topography, biota and human activities have contributed to the considerable diversity of soil types and thus soil erosion problems. National soils can be classified into 12 classes. These are: Oxisols (38.7%), Alfisols (20.0%), Inceptisols (2.7%), Mollisols (0.5%), Spodosols (1.6%), Gleysols (3.7%), Aridisols (2.7%), Entisols (14.5%), Vertisols (2.0%), Ultisols (1.8%), Plinthosols (6%) and Alisols (4.3%). The erodibility of these Soil Orders is reviewed and is mainly related to soil texture. Sands and loamy sands are especially erodible. Soil erosion patterns are complex, being influenced by rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, topography, land use and management characteristics. Urban areas have specific erosion problems and there are illustrated using a case study from São Luis (north-east Brazil). Soil erosion rates can be excessive, in some cases exceeding 100 tonnes per hectare per year. Particularly serious soil erosion is associated with six regions. These are north-western Paraná State; the Central Plateau, in the Centre Western Region; Western São Paulo State; the Paraíba do Sul middle drainage basin, in Rio de Janeiro State; Campanha Gaúcha in Rio Grande do Sul State and Triângulo Mineiro, in western Minas Gerais State. Examples of effective soil conservation are presented, using case studies from both Paraná and Santa Catarina States. Integrated management of drainage basins offers a promising way forward for effective soil conservation in Brazil.
Citation:
Anuário do Instituto de Geociências 37 (1 ) : 81-91
Publisher:
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Journal:
Anuário do Instituto de Geociências
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/315227
Additional Links:
http://www.anuario.igeo.ufrj.br/2014_1/2014_1_81_91.pdf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0101-9759
Appears in Collections:
Plant and Environmental Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuerra, Antonio J. T.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJorge, Maria do Carmo Oliveiraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlexandre, Silvia Teixeiraen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-03T10:59:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-04-03T10:59:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationAnuário do Instituto de Geociências 37 (1 ) : 81-91en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0101-9759-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/315227-
dc.description.abstractBrazil covers 8,547,403 km2 and is divided into five regions (Northern, North Western, Central Western, South Eastern and Southern). The diversity of climate, geology, topography, biota and human activities have contributed to the considerable diversity of soil types and thus soil erosion problems. National soils can be classified into 12 classes. These are: Oxisols (38.7%), Alfisols (20.0%), Inceptisols (2.7%), Mollisols (0.5%), Spodosols (1.6%), Gleysols (3.7%), Aridisols (2.7%), Entisols (14.5%), Vertisols (2.0%), Ultisols (1.8%), Plinthosols (6%) and Alisols (4.3%). The erodibility of these Soil Orders is reviewed and is mainly related to soil texture. Sands and loamy sands are especially erodible. Soil erosion patterns are complex, being influenced by rainfall erosivity, soil erodibility, topography, land use and management characteristics. Urban areas have specific erosion problems and there are illustrated using a case study from São Luis (north-east Brazil). Soil erosion rates can be excessive, in some cases exceeding 100 tonnes per hectare per year. Particularly serious soil erosion is associated with six regions. These are north-western Paraná State; the Central Plateau, in the Centre Western Region; Western São Paulo State; the Paraíba do Sul middle drainage basin, in Rio de Janeiro State; Campanha Gaúcha in Rio Grande do Sul State and Triângulo Mineiro, in western Minas Gerais State. Examples of effective soil conservation are presented, using case studies from both Paraná and Santa Catarina States. Integrated management of drainage basins offers a promising way forward for effective soil conservation in Brazil.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversidade Federal do Rio de Janeiroen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.anuario.igeo.ufrj.br/2014_1/2014_1_81_91.pdfen_GB
dc.subjectSoil erosionen_GB
dc.subjectsoil conservationen_GB
dc.subjectsoil mappingen_GB
dc.titleSoil Erosion and Conservation in Brazilen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnuário do Instituto de Geociênciasen_GB
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