2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/314592
Title:
Composition Portfolio
Authors:
Foster, Christopher
Abstract:
Composition is a process of applied research. In a portfolio of eight original pieces, the technical and aesthetic components of this process are investigated from the perspective of several theoretical precepts which both inform and underpin its creative strategy. Drawing on theories of intertextuality, composition is collocated within a broad current of thought in which ideas and material from pre-existing ‘texts’ across a variety of disciplines are utilised and explored to create new compositional ‘texts’. This procedure is tested from several, key perspectives, characterised variously as: (i) problem-seeking, (ii) serendipitous, (iii) transgressive, and (iv) transcriptive. The first of these draws on John Dewey’s notions of art as a form of creative problematisation. In the second, techniques are developed in which performance flexibility is balanced against structural exactitude, aided by a series of parametric tables that outline a range of variables across the different elements of musical sound. As a transgressive process, compositional procedure is informed by Viktor Shklovsky’s theory of aesthetic defamiliarisation. Finally, as a form of transcription, the research draws on Ferruccio Busoni’s observations about notation and its key transmutational role in manipulating and recasting musical ideas. By adopting an eclectic attitude towards materials and techniques, a compositional strategy is formulated which offers an alternative to the assumption that advancement in the field is inevitably shaped by an ineluctable, dialectical process. A polyvalent approach and direct interaction with materials, it is argued, are the important creative ingredients which present valuable and meaningful developments in compositional language, form and technique.
Advisors:
Finnissy, Michael
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Aug-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/314592
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorFinnissy, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Christopheren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-25T12:24:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-25T12:24:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-08-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/314592-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Philosophyen_GB
dc.description.abstractComposition is a process of applied research. In a portfolio of eight original pieces, the technical and aesthetic components of this process are investigated from the perspective of several theoretical precepts which both inform and underpin its creative strategy. Drawing on theories of intertextuality, composition is collocated within a broad current of thought in which ideas and material from pre-existing ‘texts’ across a variety of disciplines are utilised and explored to create new compositional ‘texts’. This procedure is tested from several, key perspectives, characterised variously as: (i) problem-seeking, (ii) serendipitous, (iii) transgressive, and (iv) transcriptive. The first of these draws on John Dewey’s notions of art as a form of creative problematisation. In the second, techniques are developed in which performance flexibility is balanced against structural exactitude, aided by a series of parametric tables that outline a range of variables across the different elements of musical sound. As a transgressive process, compositional procedure is informed by Viktor Shklovsky’s theory of aesthetic defamiliarisation. Finally, as a form of transcription, the research draws on Ferruccio Busoni’s observations about notation and its key transmutational role in manipulating and recasting musical ideas. By adopting an eclectic attitude towards materials and techniques, a compositional strategy is formulated which offers an alternative to the assumption that advancement in the field is inevitably shaped by an ineluctable, dialectical process. A polyvalent approach and direct interaction with materials, it is argued, are the important creative ingredients which present valuable and meaningful developments in compositional language, form and technique.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectCompositionen_GB
dc.subjectdefamiliarisationen_GB
dc.subjectbiomechanical studiesen_GB
dc.subjectimageen_GB
dc.subjectopen worken_GB
dc.subjectintertextualityen_GB
dc.subjecttranscriptionen_GB
dc.subjecttransgressionen_GB
dc.subjectproblem-seekingen_GB
dc.titleComposition Portfolioen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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