2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/31392
Title:
Vegetable fibre degradation in polluted water
Authors:
Karri, R.S.; Sarsby, Robert W.; Fullen, Michael A.
Other Titles:
Geotechnical and Environmental Aspects of Waste Disposal Sites: Proceedings of Green4, International Symposium on Geotechnics Related to the Envionment, Wolverhampton, UK 28 June - 1 July 2004
Abstract:
Over the past 25 years large quantities of vegetative matter (particularly gardening waste) have been deposited in engineered landfills. The fibrous nature of this type of waste initially creates a form of 'soil reinforcement' within the refuse mass. With time the fibres will degrade and the reinforcing effect will be lost and this could have a serious effect on the stability of refuse slopes. Laboratory tests have been conducted to investigate the effect of pore water composition on the strength properties of fibrous vegetable matter and individual vegetable fibres. This preliminary assessment of whether the stability of 'as-constructed' landfill slopes is likely to be affected significantly by decomposition of vegetable matter within the refuse was conducted using a 'typical' vegetable fibre.
Citation:
In: Sarsby, R.W. and Felton, A.J. (Eds.), Geotechnical and Environmental Aspects Waste Disposal Sites, 43-47
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis Group (CRC Press)
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/31392
Additional Links:
http://www.crcpress.com/shopping_cart/products/product_detail.asp?isbn=9780415425957
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
Description:
Despite the importance of preserving the environment in out developing world, activity involving the extraction of natural resources and the disposal of waster continues to increase. Such operations need to be conducted in a carefully-controlled manner, protecting both the natural environment and the communities who live in the vicinity. Drawing expertise from 19 countries around the world, this book discusses the engineered disposal of waste in landfills as well as how to manage land contaminated by waste disposal and fluid flows. It provides an integrated view of the latest research and practice in waste disposal as well as environmental management. (CRC Press)
ISBN:
9780415425957
Appears in Collections:
Plant and Environmental Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKarri, R.S.-
dc.contributor.authorSarsby, Robert W.-
dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-07-09T11:18:35Z-
dc.date.available2008-07-09T11:18:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationIn: Sarsby, R.W. and Felton, A.J. (Eds.), Geotechnical and Environmental Aspects Waste Disposal Sites, 43-47en
dc.identifier.isbn9780415425957-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/31392-
dc.descriptionDespite the importance of preserving the environment in out developing world, activity involving the extraction of natural resources and the disposal of waster continues to increase. Such operations need to be conducted in a carefully-controlled manner, protecting both the natural environment and the communities who live in the vicinity. Drawing expertise from 19 countries around the world, this book discusses the engineered disposal of waste in landfills as well as how to manage land contaminated by waste disposal and fluid flows. It provides an integrated view of the latest research and practice in waste disposal as well as environmental management. (CRC Press)en
dc.description.abstractOver the past 25 years large quantities of vegetative matter (particularly gardening waste) have been deposited in engineered landfills. The fibrous nature of this type of waste initially creates a form of 'soil reinforcement' within the refuse mass. With time the fibres will degrade and the reinforcing effect will be lost and this could have a serious effect on the stability of refuse slopes. Laboratory tests have been conducted to investigate the effect of pore water composition on the strength properties of fibrous vegetable matter and individual vegetable fibres. This preliminary assessment of whether the stability of 'as-constructed' landfill slopes is likely to be affected significantly by decomposition of vegetable matter within the refuse was conducted using a 'typical' vegetable fibre.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group (CRC Press)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.crcpress.com/shopping_cart/products/product_detail.asp?isbn=9780415425957en
dc.subjectLeachateen
dc.subjectGroundwateren
dc.subjectFly ashen
dc.subjectBentoniteen
dc.subjectGEOWEBen
dc.subjectParkanoen
dc.subjectAnhydriteen
dc.subjectShear strengthen
dc.subjectWaste managementen
dc.subjectGeotextilesen
dc.subjectHydraulic conductivityen
dc.subjectLandfill gasen
dc.subjectBiodegradation, Environmentalen
dc.subjectThermal conductivityen
dc.subjectDirect shear testsen
dc.subjectElectro-osmosisen
dc.subjectAdsorptionen
dc.subjectLactateen
dc.subjectBelzecen
dc.subjectWater pollution-
dc.titleVegetable fibre degradation in polluted wateren
dc.title.alternativeGeotechnical and Environmental Aspects of Waste Disposal Sites: Proceedings of Green4, International Symposium on Geotechnics Related to the Envionment, Wolverhampton, UK 28 June - 1 July 2004en
dc.typeBook chapteren
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