A comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313631
Title:
A comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers.
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew A.; Felton, Lee; Galloway, Shaun
Abstract:
Most stretching techniques are designed to place a "stress" on the musculoskeletal unit that will increase its resting length and range of motion (ROM). Twenty-four adolescent dancers participated in a 6-week intervention program that compared low-intensity stretching (Microstretching) with moderate-intensity static stretching on active and passive ranges of motion. Microstretching is a new modality that reduces the possibility of the parasympathetic system being activated. Repeated measures analysis indicated changes in ROM over the intervention period (p < 0.05), with the Microstretching group demonstrating greater increases in passive and active ROM than the static stretch group (p < 0.01); there was no noted bilateral differences in ROM. The results from this study agree with past studies that have found that stretching increases the compliance of any given muscle and therefore increases the range of motion. One main finding of the present study was that throughout a 6-week training program very-low-intensity stretching had a greater positive effect on lower-limb ROM than moderate-intensity static stretching. The most interesting aspect of the study was the greater increase in active ROM compared to passive ROM by the Microstretching group. This suggests that adaptation has occurred within the muscle itself to a greater extent than in structures of the hip joint. Practical application for this technique suggests it is beneficial as a postexercise modality that potentially has a restorative component.
Citation:
A comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers. 2009, 23 (7):2144-8 J Strength Cond Res
Publisher:
National Strength and Conditioning Association
Journal:
Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313631
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181b3e198
PubMed ID:
19855344
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1533-4287
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Leeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGalloway, Shaunen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T13:06:10Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-04T13:06:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationA comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers. 2009, 23 (7):2144-8 J Strength Cond Resen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287-
dc.identifier.pmid19855344-
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181b3e198-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/313631-
dc.description.abstractMost stretching techniques are designed to place a "stress" on the musculoskeletal unit that will increase its resting length and range of motion (ROM). Twenty-four adolescent dancers participated in a 6-week intervention program that compared low-intensity stretching (Microstretching) with moderate-intensity static stretching on active and passive ranges of motion. Microstretching is a new modality that reduces the possibility of the parasympathetic system being activated. Repeated measures analysis indicated changes in ROM over the intervention period (p < 0.05), with the Microstretching group demonstrating greater increases in passive and active ROM than the static stretch group (p < 0.01); there was no noted bilateral differences in ROM. The results from this study agree with past studies that have found that stretching increases the compliance of any given muscle and therefore increases the range of motion. One main finding of the present study was that throughout a 6-week training program very-low-intensity stretching had a greater positive effect on lower-limb ROM than moderate-intensity static stretching. The most interesting aspect of the study was the greater increase in active ROM compared to passive ROM by the Microstretching group. This suggests that adaptation has occurred within the muscle itself to a greater extent than in structures of the hip joint. Practical application for this technique suggests it is beneficial as a postexercise modality that potentially has a restorative component.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Strength and Conditioning Associationen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_GB
dc.subject.meshChilden_GB
dc.subject.meshDancingen_GB
dc.subject.meshHip Jointen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshLegen_GB
dc.subject.meshMuscle Stretching Exercisesen_GB
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen_GB
dc.subject.meshRange of Motion, Articularen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen_GB
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