2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313629
Title:
Whole-body vibration training increases vertical jump height in a dance population.
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew A.; Guinan, Danielle; Hawkey, Adam
Abstract:
Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has gained popularity with the strength and conditioning environment. Previous research reported improvements in strength and power after WBV interventions in untrained individuals with little hypertrophical development of the muscles, suggesting that the improvements are because of neuromuscular adaptations. The present intervention study recruited moderately trained individuals that have jumping as integral to their training. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention group was exposed to WBV at 35 Hz for 5 minutes twice a week, whereas the control group was exposed to a similar isometric contraction stress. Results indicated that after a 6-week intervention, vertical jump height increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the intervention group than in the control group. The study concluded that WBV was able to maintain vertical jump height with very little intervention time (10 minutes a week) and therefore should be considered as an intervention form for maintaining jump performance.
Citation:
Whole-body vibration training increases vertical jump height in a dance population. 2010, 24 (3):866-70 J Strength Cond Res
Publisher:
Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins
Journal:
Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association
Issue Date:
Mar-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313629
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181c7c640
PubMed ID:
20145555
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1533-4287
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuinan, Danielleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHawkey, Adamen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T13:05:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-04T13:05:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010-03-
dc.identifier.citationWhole-body vibration training increases vertical jump height in a dance population. 2010, 24 (3):866-70 J Strength Cond Resen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287-
dc.identifier.pmid20145555-
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181c7c640-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/313629-
dc.description.abstractWhole-body vibration (WBV) training has gained popularity with the strength and conditioning environment. Previous research reported improvements in strength and power after WBV interventions in untrained individuals with little hypertrophical development of the muscles, suggesting that the improvements are because of neuromuscular adaptations. The present intervention study recruited moderately trained individuals that have jumping as integral to their training. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention group was exposed to WBV at 35 Hz for 5 minutes twice a week, whereas the control group was exposed to a similar isometric contraction stress. Results indicated that after a 6-week intervention, vertical jump height increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the intervention group than in the control group. The study concluded that WBV was able to maintain vertical jump height with very little intervention time (10 minutes a week) and therefore should be considered as an intervention form for maintaining jump performance.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams and Wilkinsen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen_GB
dc.subjectVertical jumpen_GB
dc.subjectDance performanceen_GB
dc.subjectVibrationen_GB
dc.subjectPoweren_GB
dc.subject.meshAthletic Performanceen_GB
dc.subject.meshDancingen_GB
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshIsometric Contractionen_GB
dc.subject.meshMovementen_GB
dc.subject.meshVibrationen_GB
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_GB
dc.titleWhole-body vibration training increases vertical jump height in a dance population.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Associationen_GB

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