2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313620
Title:
Cardiorespiratory Training for Dancers
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew A.
Abstract:
Dance performance has been classified as high-intensity intermittent exercise that utilizes the aerobic and glycolytic energy production systems. Dance class and rehearsal have been shown to inadequately stress these energy systems and supplemental training is one method of preparing the body to meet these demands. The use of interval exercise training to elicit the required training effect has been suggested and the recommended exerciseto- rest ratios are examined in relation to the underlying physiology. The training environment and frequency is also examined with regard to movement specificity and the need for peripheral adaptations to occur in appropriate muscle fibers. Finally, the levels of dancers (professional, vocational student, and recreational) are discussed in relation to the importance of supplemental training to their goals.
Citation:
Cardiorespiratory Training for Dancers, 9 (1) : 7-12
Journal:
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313620
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T14:10:15Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-04T14:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationCardiorespiratory Training for Dancers, 9 (1) : 7-12en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/313620-
dc.description.abstractDance performance has been classified as high-intensity intermittent exercise that utilizes the aerobic and glycolytic energy production systems. Dance class and rehearsal have been shown to inadequately stress these energy systems and supplemental training is one method of preparing the body to meet these demands. The use of interval exercise training to elicit the required training effect has been suggested and the recommended exerciseto- rest ratios are examined in relation to the underlying physiology. The training environment and frequency is also examined with regard to movement specificity and the need for peripheral adaptations to occur in appropriate muscle fibers. Finally, the levels of dancers (professional, vocational student, and recreational) are discussed in relation to the importance of supplemental training to their goals.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCardiorespiratory Training for Dancersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Dance Medicine & Scienceen_GB
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