2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313619
Title:
Dance as an eccentric form of exercise: practical implications.
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew A.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Owolabi, Emmanuel O; Kitas, George D; Paschalis, Vassilis; Koutedakis, Yiannis
Abstract:
The eccentric action is an integral part of the stretch-shortening (or eccentric-concentric) cycle of muscle movement, especially when repositioning of the centre of gravity is required. Jumps and landing tasks are examples of this cycle and are incorporated in most dance activities. However, unaccustomed eccentric muscle action can cause muscle damage, which is characterised by the development of delayed-onset muscle soreness and swelling, decline of pain-free range of motion, as well as sustained loss of muscle force and range of motion. Furthermore, unaccustomed eccentric muscle action can induce disturbances in movement economy and energy expenditure, so dancers spend more energy during a routine than usual. Such negative effects are gradually reduced and eventually disappear due to physiological adaptations to this form of muscular activity. Given that eccentric exercises also appear to induce greater muscle performance improvements than other forms of muscle conditioning, it is advised that they should be integrated into dancers' weekly schedules. The purpose of the present review is to examine the possible effects of the eccentric component of dance on the performance and health status of dancers.
Citation:
Dance as an eccentric form of exercise: practical implications. 2012, 27 (2):102-6 Med Probl Perform Art
Journal:
Medical problems of performing artists
Issue Date:
Jun-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/313619
PubMed ID:
22739823
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0885-1158
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNikolaidis, Michalis Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJamurtas, Athanasios Zen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwolabi, Emmanuel Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKitas, George Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorPaschalis, Vassilisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKoutedakis, Yiannisen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T13:04:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-04T13:04:20Z-
dc.date.issued2012-06-
dc.identifier.citationDance as an eccentric form of exercise: practical implications. 2012, 27 (2):102-6 Med Probl Perform Arten_GB
dc.identifier.issn0885-1158-
dc.identifier.pmid22739823-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/313619-
dc.description.abstractThe eccentric action is an integral part of the stretch-shortening (or eccentric-concentric) cycle of muscle movement, especially when repositioning of the centre of gravity is required. Jumps and landing tasks are examples of this cycle and are incorporated in most dance activities. However, unaccustomed eccentric muscle action can cause muscle damage, which is characterised by the development of delayed-onset muscle soreness and swelling, decline of pain-free range of motion, as well as sustained loss of muscle force and range of motion. Furthermore, unaccustomed eccentric muscle action can induce disturbances in movement economy and energy expenditure, so dancers spend more energy during a routine than usual. Such negative effects are gradually reduced and eventually disappear due to physiological adaptations to this form of muscular activity. Given that eccentric exercises also appear to induce greater muscle performance improvements than other forms of muscle conditioning, it is advised that they should be integrated into dancers' weekly schedules. The purpose of the present review is to examine the possible effects of the eccentric component of dance on the performance and health status of dancers.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Medical problems of performing artistsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Physiologicalen_GB
dc.subject.meshDancingen_GB
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolismen_GB
dc.subject.meshExerciseen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistanceen_GB
dc.subject.meshLipidsen_GB
dc.subject.meshPhysical Exertionen_GB
dc.titleDance as an eccentric form of exercise: practical implications.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMedical problems of performing artistsen_GB

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