University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Sport Performance > Identifying some determinants of "jet lag" and its symptoms: a study of athletes and other travellers.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30732
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: Identifying some determinants of "jet lag" and its symptoms: a study of athletes and other travellers.
Authors: Waterhouse, J.
Edwards, B.
Nevill, Alan M.
Carvalho, S.
Atkinson, Greg
Buckley, P.
Reilly, Thomas
Godfrey, R.J.
Ramsay, R.
Citation: British Journal of Sports Medicine, 36 (1): 54-60
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal: British Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date: 2002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30732
PubMed ID: 11867494
Additional Links: http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/36/1/54
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Travelling across multiple time zones disrupts normal circadian rhythms and induces "jet lag". Possible effects of this on training and performance in athletes were concerns before the Sydney Olympic Games. OBJECTIVE: To identify some determinants of jet lag and its symptoms. METHODS: A mixture of athletes, their coaches, and academics attending a conference (n = 85) was studied during their flights from the United Kingdom to Australia (two flights with a one hour stopover in Singapore), and for the first six days in Australia. Subjects differed in age, sex, chronotype, flexibility of sleeping habits, feelings of languor, fitness, time of arrival in Australia, and whether or not they had previous experience of travel to Australia. These variables and whether the body clock adjusted to new local time by phase advance or delay were tested as predictors for jet lag and some of its symptoms by stepwise multiple regression analyses. RESULTS: The amount of sleep in the first flight was significantly greater in those who had left the United Kingdom in the evening than the morning (medians of 5.5 hours and 1.5 hours respectively; p = 0.0002, Mann-Whitney), whereas there was no significant difference on the second flight (2.5 hours v 2.8 hours; p = 0.72). Only the severity of jet lag and assessments of sleep and fatigue were commonly predicted significantly (p<0.05) by regression analysis, and then by only some of the variables. Thus increasing age and a later time of arrival in Australia were associated with less jet lag and fatigue, and previous experience of travel to Australia was associated with an earlier time of getting to sleep. Subjects who had adjusted by phase advance suffered worse jet lag during the 5th and 6th days in Australia. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the importance of an appropriate choice of itinerary and lifestyle for reducing the negative effects of jet lag in athletes and others who wish to perform optimally in the new time zone.
Type: Article
Language: en
MeSH: Adult
Appetite
Australia
Chronobiology
Fatigue
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Jet Lag Syndrome
Male
Predictive Value of Tests
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Sleep
Sports
ISSN: 0306-3674
Appears in Collections: Sport Performance
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



Related articles on PubMed
bullet
bullet
Further assessments of the relationship between jet lag and some of its symptoms.
Waterhouse J, Nevill A, Finnegan J, Williams P, Edwards B, Kao SY, Reilly T
2005
bullet
Jet lag: therapeutic use of melatonin and possible application of melatonin analogs.
Srinivasan V, Spence DW, Pandi-Perumal SR, Trakht I, Cardinali DP
2008 Jan-Mar
bullet
bullet
Use of melatonin in recovery from jet-lag following an eastward flight across 10 time-zones.
Edwards BJ, Atkinson G, Waterhouse J, Reilly T, Godfrey R, Budgett R
2000 Oct
See all 134 articles

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies