2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30458
Title:
Pre-exercise alkalosis and Acid-base recovery.
Authors:
Siegler, J.C.; Keatley, S.; Midgley, A.W.; Nevill, Alan M.; McNaughton, Lars R.
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to observe the influence of pre-exercise sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO (3)) ingestion and varying recovery modes on acid-base recovery from a single bout of supramaximal exercise. Nine male subjects completed four separate, randomized cycle ergometer exercise trials to volitional fatigue at 120 % maximum power output, under the following conditions: 0.3 g . kg (-1) BW NaHCO (3) ingestion with passive recovery (BICARB P), 0.3 g . kg (-1) BW NaHCO (3) ingestion with active recovery (BICARB A), placebo ingestion with passive recovery (PLAC P) and placebo ingestion with active recovery (PLAC A). Capillary blood samples were obtained every minute for 15 min during recovery. Significant main effects for pH were observed for time (F = 42.1, p < 0.001), intervention (BICARB and PLAC) (F = 1117.3, p < 0.001) and recovery condition (F = 150.0, p < 0.001), as the BICARB condition reduced acid-base perturbation. Significant interaction effects were observed between conditions (BICARB and PLAC) for active and passive recovery modes (F = 29.1, p < 0.001) as the active recovery facilitated H+ removal better than the passive condition. Pre-exercise alkalosis attenuates blood acid-base perturbations from supramaximal exercise to exhaustion, regardless of whether the recovery mode is active or passive. These findings suggest that individuals may benefit from introducing a pre-exercise alkalotic condition while including passive recovery during high-intensity training protocols.
Citation:
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 29(7): 545-551
Publisher:
Georg Thieme Verlag
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Medicine
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30458
DOI:
10.1055/s-2007-989261
PubMed ID:
18004683
Additional Links:
http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-989261
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0172-4622
Appears in Collections:
Exercise and Health; Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group; Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSiegler, J.C.-
dc.contributor.authorKeatley, S.-
dc.contributor.authorMidgley, A.W.-
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.-
dc.contributor.authorMcNaughton, Lars R.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-25T13:17:49Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-25T13:17:49Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sports Medicine, 29(7): 545-551en
dc.identifier.issn0172-4622-
dc.identifier.pmid18004683-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-2007-989261-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/30458-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to observe the influence of pre-exercise sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO (3)) ingestion and varying recovery modes on acid-base recovery from a single bout of supramaximal exercise. Nine male subjects completed four separate, randomized cycle ergometer exercise trials to volitional fatigue at 120 % maximum power output, under the following conditions: 0.3 g . kg (-1) BW NaHCO (3) ingestion with passive recovery (BICARB P), 0.3 g . kg (-1) BW NaHCO (3) ingestion with active recovery (BICARB A), placebo ingestion with passive recovery (PLAC P) and placebo ingestion with active recovery (PLAC A). Capillary blood samples were obtained every minute for 15 min during recovery. Significant main effects for pH were observed for time (F = 42.1, p < 0.001), intervention (BICARB and PLAC) (F = 1117.3, p < 0.001) and recovery condition (F = 150.0, p < 0.001), as the BICARB condition reduced acid-base perturbation. Significant interaction effects were observed between conditions (BICARB and PLAC) for active and passive recovery modes (F = 29.1, p < 0.001) as the active recovery facilitated H+ removal better than the passive condition. Pre-exercise alkalosis attenuates blood acid-base perturbations from supramaximal exercise to exhaustion, regardless of whether the recovery mode is active or passive. These findings suggest that individuals may benefit from introducing a pre-exercise alkalotic condition while including passive recovery during high-intensity training protocols.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-989261en
dc.subjectSodium bicarbonateen
dc.subjectActive recoveryen
dc.subjectpH recoveryen
dc.subjectSupramaximal exerciseen
dc.subjectMale athletes-
dc.subjectSports Medicine-
dc.titlePre-exercise alkalosis and Acid-base recovery.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Medicineen

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