University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure > Research Centre for Sport, Exercise and Performance > Exercise and Health > The effect of a worksite based walking programme on cardiovascular risk in previously sedentary civil servants

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30396
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: The effect of a worksite based walking programme on cardiovascular risk in previously sedentary civil servants
Authors: Murphy, Marie H.
Murtagh, Elaine M.
Boreham, Colin A.G.
Hare, Lesley G.
Nevill, Alan M.
Citation: BMC Public Health, 6 : 136
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: BMC Public Health
Issue Date: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30396
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-6-136
Additional Links: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/6/136
Abstract: Background: A significant proportion of Europeans do not meet the recommendations for 30 mins of physical activity 5 times per week. Whether lower frequency, moderate intensity exercise alters cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk has received little attention. This study examined the effects of 45 minutes self-paced walking, 2 d· wk-1 on aerobic fitness, blood pressure (BP), body composition, lipids and C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in previously sedentary civil servants. Methods: 37 subjects (24 women) aged 41.5 ± 9.3 years were randomly assigned to either two 45 minute walks per week (walking group) or no training (control group). Aerobic fitness, body composition, blood pressure (BP), CRP and lipoprotein variables were measured at baseline and following 8 weeks. Steps counts were measured at baseline and during weeks 4 and 8 of the intervention. Results: Compared to the control group, the walking group showed a significant reduction in systolic BP and maintained body fat levels (P < 0.05). There were no changes other risk factors. Subjects took significantly more steps on the days when prescribed walking was performed (9303 ± 2665) compared to rest days (5803 ± 2749; P < 0.001). Conclusion: These findings suggest that walking twice per week for 45 minutes at ~ 62% HRmax, improves activity levels, reduces systolic BP and prevents an increase in body fat in previously sedentary adults. This walking prescription, however, failed to induce significant improvements in other markers of cardiovascular disease risk following eight weeks of training.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Physical activity
Walking
Cardiovascular risk
Sedentary
Civil servants
ISSN: 14712458
Appears in Collections: Exercise and Health
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group
Learning and Teaching in Sport, Exercise and Performance

Files in This Item:
File Description Size Format View/Open
BMC_Murphy et al (2006).pdf275KbAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies