2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30321
Title:
Mission impossible? Critical practice in social work.
Authors:
Stepney, Paul M.
Abstract:
In recent years, the capacity of social work to be a force for progressive policy and social change has been significantly eroded. Social work in the UK has been re-branded and reshaped within New Labour’s modernized welfare state, only to become politically compromised and compliant: ‘the dog that didn’t bark’ even when its soul appeared to be stripped out. This article offers a response to this predicament informed by a structural modernist analysis revitalized by elements of critical postmodernism (Fook, 2002). Without wishing to offer any definitive prescriptions, the concept of critical practice is worthy of consideration, as it offers the potential for combining the role of protection with prevention whilst embodying possibilities for critical reflection and change. This became the focus of a recent conference organized around the theme of celebrating social work (Torfaen, 2002). Further, it offers practitioners a means for critical engagement with the issues that lie at the root of injustice and exclusion, to develop a more emancipatory approach, whilst resisting pressures for more enforcement and control.
Citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 36(8): 1298-1307
Publisher:
Oxford: Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30321
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bch388
Additional Links:
http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/36/8/1289
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00453102; 1468263X
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Health and Social Care Improvement

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStepney, Paul M.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-23T12:45:06Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-23T12:45:06Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Social Work, 36(8): 1298-1307en
dc.identifier.issn00453102-
dc.identifier.issn1468263X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bch388-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/30321-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, the capacity of social work to be a force for progressive policy and social change has been significantly eroded. Social work in the UK has been re-branded and reshaped within New Labour’s modernized welfare state, only to become politically compromised and compliant: ‘the dog that didn’t bark’ even when its soul appeared to be stripped out. This article offers a response to this predicament informed by a structural modernist analysis revitalized by elements of critical postmodernism (Fook, 2002). Without wishing to offer any definitive prescriptions, the concept of critical practice is worthy of consideration, as it offers the potential for combining the role of protection with prevention whilst embodying possibilities for critical reflection and change. This became the focus of a recent conference organized around the theme of celebrating social work (Torfaen, 2002). Further, it offers practitioners a means for critical engagement with the issues that lie at the root of injustice and exclusion, to develop a more emancipatory approach, whilst resisting pressures for more enforcement and control.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford: Oxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/36/8/1289en
dc.subjectSocial worken
dc.subjectSocial Welfareen
dc.subjectCritical practiceen
dc.subjectSocial justiceen
dc.subjectSocial inclusionen
dc.subjectSocial policyen
dc.subjectProfessional ethicsen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.subjectEmancipationen
dc.subjectWelfare reformen
dc.subjectThird wayen
dc.subjectTough loveen
dc.titleMission impossible? Critical practice in social work.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken
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