Effect of material deprivation on Epstein-Barr virus infection in Hodgkin's disease in the West Midlands.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30254
Title:
Effect of material deprivation on Epstein-Barr virus infection in Hodgkin's disease in the West Midlands.
Authors:
Flavell, Joanne R.; Constandinou, C.; Lowe, D.; Scott, K.; Newey, C.; Evans, D.; Dutton, A.; Simmons, S.; Smith, Richard; Crocker, John; Young, Lawrence S.; Murray, Paul G.
Abstract:
We have used Townsend scores from postcode data to compare levels of material deprivation and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positivity for 223 patients diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease (HD) in the period 1981-1997. The presence of EBV in HD tumours was determined using in situ hybridization to target the abundantly expressed EBV early RNAs. EBV was detected in the malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in 47/223 HD cases (21%). There was found to be a tendency for higher Townsend scores (indicative of higher levels of material deprivation) in EBV-positive HD patients, but this association was not statistically significant. When various subgroups of patients from the study were examined separately the indication of higher Townsend scores in EBV-positive patients was found to be more marked for patients with mixed cellularity disease (P = 0.09) and for females (P = 0.03). The results of this study suggest that differences in the level of material deprivation are important in determining the likelihood of EBV-positive HD in the UK, particularly for certain subgroups of patients. It is not known what specific socioeconomic factors are responsible for these differences, although alterations in the timing or rate of primary EBV infection, or decline in the level of EBV-specific immunity, may be important. (Cancer Research UK)
Citation:
British Journal of Cancer, 80(3-4): 604-608
Publisher:
nature.com
Journal:
British Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/30254
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6690398
PubMed ID:
10408873
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/v80/n3/abs/6690398a.html
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-0920; 1532-1827
Appears in Collections:
Molecular Immunology Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlavell, Joanne R.-
dc.contributor.authorConstandinou, C.-
dc.contributor.authorLowe, D.-
dc.contributor.authorScott, K.-
dc.contributor.authorNewey, C.-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D.-
dc.contributor.authorDutton, A.-
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, S.-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Richard-
dc.contributor.authorCrocker, John-
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Lawrence S.-
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Paul G.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-20T10:28:32Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-20T10:28:32Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Cancer, 80(3-4): 604-608en
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920-
dc.identifier.issn1532-1827-
dc.identifier.pmid10408873-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6690398-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/30254-
dc.description.abstractWe have used Townsend scores from postcode data to compare levels of material deprivation and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positivity for 223 patients diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease (HD) in the period 1981-1997. The presence of EBV in HD tumours was determined using in situ hybridization to target the abundantly expressed EBV early RNAs. EBV was detected in the malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in 47/223 HD cases (21%). There was found to be a tendency for higher Townsend scores (indicative of higher levels of material deprivation) in EBV-positive HD patients, but this association was not statistically significant. When various subgroups of patients from the study were examined separately the indication of higher Townsend scores in EBV-positive patients was found to be more marked for patients with mixed cellularity disease (P = 0.09) and for females (P = 0.03). The results of this study suggest that differences in the level of material deprivation are important in determining the likelihood of EBV-positive HD in the UK, particularly for certain subgroups of patients. It is not known what specific socioeconomic factors are responsible for these differences, although alterations in the timing or rate of primary EBV infection, or decline in the level of EBV-specific immunity, may be important. (Cancer Research UK)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publishernature.comen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/v80/n3/abs/6690398a.htmlen
dc.subjectEpstein-Barr virusen
dc.subjectHodgkin's Diseaseen
dc.subjectWest Midlandsen
dc.subjectMaterial deprivationen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshChildrenen
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshEnglanden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHerpesviridae Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 4, Humanen
dc.subject.meshHodgkin's Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridizationen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPovertyen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infectionsen
dc.titleEffect of material deprivation on Epstein-Barr virus infection in Hodgkin's disease in the West Midlands.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.