Peak-power estimation equations in 12- to 16-year old children: comparing linear with allometric models.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/300631
Title:
Peak-power estimation equations in 12- to 16-year old children: comparing linear with allometric models.
Authors:
Duncan, Michael J; Hankey, Joanne; Nevill, Alan M.
Abstract:
This study examined the efficacy of peak-power estimation equations in children using force platform data and determined whether allometric modeling offers a sounder alternative to estimating peak power in pediatric samples. Ninety one boys and girls aged 12-16 years performed 3 countermovement jumps (CMJ) on a force platform. Estimated peak power (PPest) was determined using the Harman et al., Sayers SJ, Sayers CMJ, and Canavan and Vescovi equations. All 4 equations were associated with actual peak power (r = 0.893-0.909, all p < .01). There were significant differences between PPest using the Harman et al., Sayers SJ, and Sayers CMJ equations (p < .05) and actual peak power (PPactual). ANCOVA also indicated sex and age effect for PPactual (p < .01). Following a random two-thirds to one-third split of participants, an additive linear model (p = .0001) predicted PPactual (adjusted R2 = .866) from body mass and CMJ height in the two-thirds split (n = 60). An allometric model using CMJ height, body mass, and age was then developed with this sample, which predicted 88.8% of the variance in PPactual (p < .0001, adjusted R2 = .888). The regression equations were cross-validated using the one-third split sample (n = 31), evidencing a significant positive relationship (r = .910, p = .001) and no significant difference (p = .151) between PPactual and PPest using this equation. The allometric and linear models determined from this study provide accurate models to estimate peak power in children.
Citation:
Peak-power estimation equations in 12- to 16-year old children: comparing linear with allometric models. 2013, 25 (3):385-93 Pediatr Exerc Sci
Journal:
Pediatric exercise science
Issue Date:
Aug-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/300631
PubMed ID:
23881526
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1543-2920
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHankey, Joanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-02T14:30:28Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-02T14:30:28Z-
dc.date.issued2013-08-
dc.identifier.citationPeak-power estimation equations in 12- to 16-year old children: comparing linear with allometric models. 2013, 25 (3):385-93 Pediatr Exerc Scien_GB
dc.identifier.issn1543-2920-
dc.identifier.pmid23881526-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/300631-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the efficacy of peak-power estimation equations in children using force platform data and determined whether allometric modeling offers a sounder alternative to estimating peak power in pediatric samples. Ninety one boys and girls aged 12-16 years performed 3 countermovement jumps (CMJ) on a force platform. Estimated peak power (PPest) was determined using the Harman et al., Sayers SJ, Sayers CMJ, and Canavan and Vescovi equations. All 4 equations were associated with actual peak power (r = 0.893-0.909, all p < .01). There were significant differences between PPest using the Harman et al., Sayers SJ, and Sayers CMJ equations (p < .05) and actual peak power (PPactual). ANCOVA also indicated sex and age effect for PPactual (p < .01). Following a random two-thirds to one-third split of participants, an additive linear model (p = .0001) predicted PPactual (adjusted R2 = .866) from body mass and CMJ height in the two-thirds split (n = 60). An allometric model using CMJ height, body mass, and age was then developed with this sample, which predicted 88.8% of the variance in PPactual (p < .0001, adjusted R2 = .888). The regression equations were cross-validated using the one-third split sample (n = 31), evidencing a significant positive relationship (r = .910, p = .001) and no significant difference (p = .151) between PPactual and PPest using this equation. The allometric and linear models determined from this study provide accurate models to estimate peak power in children.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pediatric exercise scienceen_GB
dc.titlePeak-power estimation equations in 12- to 16-year old children: comparing linear with allometric models.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPediatric exercise scienceen_GB

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