A Quantitative Analysis of the Economic Incentives of sub-Saharan Africa Urban Land Use Planning Systems: Case Study of Accra, Ghana.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/298945
Title:
A Quantitative Analysis of the Economic Incentives of sub-Saharan Africa Urban Land Use Planning Systems: Case Study of Accra, Ghana.
Authors:
Baffour Awuah, K.G.
Abstract:
The deficiency of sub-Saharan Africa urban land use planning regimes has received extensive discussion in the literature. As yet, little is known of the extent and magnitude of the economic impact of these planning regimes on the economic wellbeing of individuals and the society. This situation is further compounded by the lack of simplified and bespoke methodologies for calibrating economic impacts of planning policies even in the developed world where there are relatively huge volumes of organised data. This study aims to prescribe a simplified quantitative methodology, which is subsequently employed to gauge the economic impacts of these regimes. It proceeds on the central argument that planning regimes in the sub-region are weak with low compliance with planning regulations, partly because they do not provide incentives for property owners/developers/land users. The study adopts a cross-sectional survey strategywith questionnaires and administrative data extraction to procure the requisite data from Accra, Ghana to feed the devised methodological framework. The study establishes that Ghana’s urban land use planning regime, in its current form, imposes huge cost on residential property owners compared to its benefits; it creates a disincentive for property owners. A substantial amount of this cost emanates from pipe-borne water, and tarred roads and concrete drain infrastructural facilities. It is further established that the cost of title formalisation requirement constitutes a huge portion of the cost on express requirements under the planning regime. A major portion of this cost results from the cost other than official fees. However, on individual basis the requirement generates marginal net benefit. Incidental costs for the other express requirements, architectural design and building permit are also substantial. In terms of benefits, tarred roads and concrete drains, formalised title, electricity and pipe-borne water, individually, are found to generate the most benefits under the planning regime. The study makes a number of recommendations. These include formulation of planning policies on the basis of providing incentives to property owners/developer/land users, strategies for reduction of infrastructural and amenities costs, as well as incidental cost relating to compliance with the subject planning regime express requirements.
Advisors:
Hammond, F. N.; Lamond, J.E.; Booth, C.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Apr-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/298945
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A Thesis submitted to the School of Technology University of Wolverhampton in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHammond, F. N.en_GB
dc.contributor.advisorLamond, J.E.en_GB
dc.contributor.advisorBooth, C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaffour Awuah, K.G.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-15T15:54:57Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-15T15:54:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/298945-
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to the School of Technology University of Wolverhampton in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophyen_GB
dc.description.abstractThe deficiency of sub-Saharan Africa urban land use planning regimes has received extensive discussion in the literature. As yet, little is known of the extent and magnitude of the economic impact of these planning regimes on the economic wellbeing of individuals and the society. This situation is further compounded by the lack of simplified and bespoke methodologies for calibrating economic impacts of planning policies even in the developed world where there are relatively huge volumes of organised data. This study aims to prescribe a simplified quantitative methodology, which is subsequently employed to gauge the economic impacts of these regimes. It proceeds on the central argument that planning regimes in the sub-region are weak with low compliance with planning regulations, partly because they do not provide incentives for property owners/developers/land users. The study adopts a cross-sectional survey strategywith questionnaires and administrative data extraction to procure the requisite data from Accra, Ghana to feed the devised methodological framework. The study establishes that Ghana’s urban land use planning regime, in its current form, imposes huge cost on residential property owners compared to its benefits; it creates a disincentive for property owners. A substantial amount of this cost emanates from pipe-borne water, and tarred roads and concrete drain infrastructural facilities. It is further established that the cost of title formalisation requirement constitutes a huge portion of the cost on express requirements under the planning regime. A major portion of this cost results from the cost other than official fees. However, on individual basis the requirement generates marginal net benefit. Incidental costs for the other express requirements, architectural design and building permit are also substantial. In terms of benefits, tarred roads and concrete drains, formalised title, electricity and pipe-borne water, individually, are found to generate the most benefits under the planning regime. The study makes a number of recommendations. These include formulation of planning policies on the basis of providing incentives to property owners/developer/land users, strategies for reduction of infrastructural and amenities costs, as well as incidental cost relating to compliance with the subject planning regime express requirements.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectBenefiten_GB
dc.subjectComplianceen_GB
dc.subjectEconomic Incentivesen_GB
dc.subjectGhanaen_GB
dc.subjectHuman Actionen_GB
dc.subjectLand use Regulationen_GB
dc.subjectQuantitativeen_GB
dc.subjectsub-Saharan Africaen_GB
dc.subjectUrban Development Costen_GB
dc.subjectUrban Land use Planningen_GB
dc.titleA Quantitative Analysis of the Economic Incentives of sub-Saharan Africa Urban Land Use Planning Systems: Case Study of Accra, Ghana.en_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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