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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Law, Social Sciences and Communications > School of Legal Studies > Legal Studies Research Group  > State Power and the War on Terror: A Comparative Analysis of the USA and UK

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29894
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Title: State Power and the War on Terror: A Comparative Analysis of the USA and UK
Authors: Moran, Jonathan
Citation: Crime Law and Social Change, 44(4-5): 335-359
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Journal: Crime Law and Social Change
Issue Date: 2005
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29894
DOI: 10.1007/s10611-006-9026-4
Additional Links: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f516632023kr3571/
http://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=190910430&ETOC=RN&from=searchengine
Abstract: This paper analyses the patterns and extent of state power in the war on terror. The paper argues that the War on Terror has seen important extensions in state power, which pose challenges not only for globalisation theorists and advocates of international law, but also theorists of the managerial or limited state, or those who see the state as over-determined in various ways by societal mechanisms or actors. Recent analyses, prompted by events in the War on Terror, have begun to focus on the extent of state power, rather than its perceived fundamental limits in late modern society. This reflects a need to analyse the politics and processes of national security. Having made this point, extensions in state power must be viewed in context and dynamically with regard to their effect on civil liberties, necessary to avoid a 'flattened' a-historical approach to state power and civil society. The problem of state power will be examined with regard to the UK and USA. The UK and the USA represent different constitutional arrangements, jurisdictions, legal and administrative intelligence and law enforcement powers, systems of accountability and political cultures. However as late modern liberal democracies they also display remarkable similarities and stand as illuminating examples to contrast structural patterns of state power, politics and civil society. They have also been identified as representing the evolution of the limited late modern state.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Civil liberties
Terrorism
UK
USA
Counter-terrorism
International law
State power
National security
Government policy
Globalisation
War studies
ISSN: 0925-4994
1573-0751
Appears in Collections: Legal Studies Research Group
Legal Studies Research Group

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