Diagnosing and Treating the Voices:The Professionals’ and Clients’ perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/297682
Title:
Diagnosing and Treating the Voices:The Professionals’ and Clients’ perspective
Authors:
Gearing, Dawn
Abstract:
The aims of this study were to explore professionals’ and clients’ experiences of diagnosis and treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations with a view to identifying important clinical issues for counselling psychologists. Six professionals, three psychologists and three psychiatrists, who had worked with people who hear voices, alongside four clients who hear voices, volunteered and participated in a semi-structured interview. These interviews were transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) as described by Smith, Flowers and Larkin (2009). A table of super-ordinate and sub-ordinate themes was created as a result of this analysis. A number of themes arose from both groups of participants’ experiences. The main themes that arose for the professionals was: professional ambivalence; varying theories on causes of voices; perspectives on diagnosis and formulation; perspectives on medication; thoughts on working therapeutically; and, thinking on recovery. The themes that arose from the clients’ experiences were feelings about diagnosis and experiences of treatment. This research concludes that there is professional ambivalence in working with people who hear voices that is caused by a lack of certainty about the causes of the phenomenon alongside a lack of training in working with clients who have symptoms of psychosis. This impacts clients in several ways. The clients in this study were not offered the option to have any involvement in their own care and none of them were offered therapy as a treatment option. The study also concludes that psychiatric diagnosis does not consider all pertinent information related to clients’ issues which can lead to inconsistency in the diagnosis of clients who hear voices.
Advisors:
Hart, Nicky; Hulbert-Williams, Nick
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/297682
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A portfolio submitted to the University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate: Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psych
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHart, Nickyen_GB
dc.contributor.advisorHulbert-Williams, Nicken_GB
dc.contributor.authorGearing, Dawnen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T13:53:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-09T13:53:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/297682-
dc.descriptionA portfolio submitted to the University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate: Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psychen_GB
dc.description.abstractThe aims of this study were to explore professionals’ and clients’ experiences of diagnosis and treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations with a view to identifying important clinical issues for counselling psychologists. Six professionals, three psychologists and three psychiatrists, who had worked with people who hear voices, alongside four clients who hear voices, volunteered and participated in a semi-structured interview. These interviews were transcribed and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) as described by Smith, Flowers and Larkin (2009). A table of super-ordinate and sub-ordinate themes was created as a result of this analysis. A number of themes arose from both groups of participants’ experiences. The main themes that arose for the professionals was: professional ambivalence; varying theories on causes of voices; perspectives on diagnosis and formulation; perspectives on medication; thoughts on working therapeutically; and, thinking on recovery. The themes that arose from the clients’ experiences were feelings about diagnosis and experiences of treatment. This research concludes that there is professional ambivalence in working with people who hear voices that is caused by a lack of certainty about the causes of the phenomenon alongside a lack of training in working with clients who have symptoms of psychosis. This impacts clients in several ways. The clients in this study were not offered the option to have any involvement in their own care and none of them were offered therapy as a treatment option. The study also concludes that psychiatric diagnosis does not consider all pertinent information related to clients’ issues which can lead to inconsistency in the diagnosis of clients who hear voices.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectauditoryen_GB
dc.subjectverbalen_GB
dc.subjecthallucinationsen_GB
dc.subjectschizophreniaen_GB
dc.subjectpsychosisen_GB
dc.subjectpsychiatric diagnosisen_GB
dc.subjecttreatment and interventionsen_GB
dc.subjecttraumaen_GB
dc.subjectchildhood abuseen_GB
dc.subjectdissociative symptomsen_GB
dc.subjectpsychiatric trainingen_GB
dc.subjectpsychological trainingen_GB
dc.subjectside effects of antipsychoticsen_GB
dc.subjectRomme & Escheren_GB
dc.titleDiagnosing and Treating the Voices:The Professionals’ and Clients’ perspectiveen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameDCounsPsychen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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