Exploring Indian Indigenous Counselling Techniques

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/297666
Title:
Exploring Indian Indigenous Counselling Techniques
Authors:
Mundra, Neha
Other Titles:
Evaluating their Effectiveness and Contribution to Counselling Psychology
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore whether Indian counsellors and psychotherapists in the UK practice in an indigenous way with their Indian clients. The aim was to find out more information about the different types of Indian indigenous interventions that may currently be used by these professionals. The study also bridges the gap in the literature about the lack of research on the practical uses and applications of Indian indigenous counselling skills in the UK.The study reports data from six face-to-face open-ended semi-structured interviews with Indian counsellors who have been trained in Western psychotherapeutic approaches and have knowledge of Indian psychotherapeutic approaches. The research was analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Firstly, the analysis concluded the use of several Indian indigenous interventions used by the participants, such as Prekshadhyan which can be used for psychosomatic pain relief, Jain virtue of forgiveness which can be useful for working with sexual abuse, use of spirituality and cultural beliefs for bereavement, and so on. Secondly, the analysis identified some of the most common barriers to therapy (e.g. stigmas and taboos) experienced by Indian clients in the UK, and it provided suggestions on how to overcome these. Finally, the analysis suggested factors that therapists should pay attention to (e.g. client context and use of Indian languages) in order to maximise Indian clients’ engagement in therapy and to minimise their exclusion from it.
Advisors:
Darby, Richard Dr.; Galbraith, Victoria Dr.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/297666
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Counselling Psychology
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorDarby, Richard Dr.en_GB
dc.contributor.advisorGalbraith, Victoria Dr.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMundra, Nehaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T10:03:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-09T10:03:24Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/297666-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Counselling Psychologyen_GB
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore whether Indian counsellors and psychotherapists in the UK practice in an indigenous way with their Indian clients. The aim was to find out more information about the different types of Indian indigenous interventions that may currently be used by these professionals. The study also bridges the gap in the literature about the lack of research on the practical uses and applications of Indian indigenous counselling skills in the UK.The study reports data from six face-to-face open-ended semi-structured interviews with Indian counsellors who have been trained in Western psychotherapeutic approaches and have knowledge of Indian psychotherapeutic approaches. The research was analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Firstly, the analysis concluded the use of several Indian indigenous interventions used by the participants, such as Prekshadhyan which can be used for psychosomatic pain relief, Jain virtue of forgiveness which can be useful for working with sexual abuse, use of spirituality and cultural beliefs for bereavement, and so on. Secondly, the analysis identified some of the most common barriers to therapy (e.g. stigmas and taboos) experienced by Indian clients in the UK, and it provided suggestions on how to overcome these. Finally, the analysis suggested factors that therapists should pay attention to (e.g. client context and use of Indian languages) in order to maximise Indian clients’ engagement in therapy and to minimise their exclusion from it.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectIndigenousen_GB
dc.subjecttranscultural counsellingen_GB
dc.subjectcounselling techniquesen_GB
dc.subjectinterventionsen_GB
dc.subjectElectrolessen_GB
dc.subjectnickelen_GB
dc.subjectaluminiumen_GB
dc.titleExploring Indian Indigenous Counselling Techniquesen_GB
dc.title.alternativeEvaluating their Effectiveness and Contribution to Counselling Psychologyen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameDCounsPsychen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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