The support needs of foster carers who look after young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/297633
Title:
The support needs of foster carers who look after young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties
Authors:
Hillyer, Rachael
Abstract:
The poor outcomes of young people leaving foster care are well documented and demand a focus on placement permanency and interventions that encourage stability (Rubin et al, 2007). The need for better support for foster carers is widely acknowledged (Warman, Pallet & Scott, 2006; Morgan & Baron, 2011). To provide effective support an understanding of foster carers support needs is required. A qualitative approach explored the support needs of foster carers who look after young people perceived to have emotional and behavioural difficulties. Semi- structured interviews were undertaken with 17 foster carers employed by a local authority or an Independent Fostering Agency. A grounded theory methodology within a social constructionist framework was used to develop a new theoretical understanding from the data. A central storyline of ‘keeping your head above water’ emerged and appeared to encapsulate daily struggles and ways of managing. Categories which contributed to this were ‘becoming isolated’ from other professionals, ‘role ambiguity’ regarding the multiple meanings attached to being a foster carer, ‘making sense of emotional and behavioural difficulties’ highlighting a need to understand the children cared for, ‘a focus on behaviours’ illuminating approaches to parenting and ‘unmet emotional needs’ which is a possible consequence of focussing on children’s behaviours. The emergent theory may hold potential for developing psychological formulations, interventions and training programmes for foster carers. Suggestions for future support are put forward based on the new theoretical framework. Applications of the findings to Counselling Psychology are discussed in detail.
Advisors:
Owens, Moira; Hardy, Alexandra
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/297633
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate in Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psych
Appears in Collections:
E-Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorOwens, Moiraen_GB
dc.contributor.advisorHardy, Alexandraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHillyer, Rachaelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-09T14:34:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-09T14:34:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/297633-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate in Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psychen_GB
dc.description.abstractThe poor outcomes of young people leaving foster care are well documented and demand a focus on placement permanency and interventions that encourage stability (Rubin et al, 2007). The need for better support for foster carers is widely acknowledged (Warman, Pallet & Scott, 2006; Morgan & Baron, 2011). To provide effective support an understanding of foster carers support needs is required. A qualitative approach explored the support needs of foster carers who look after young people perceived to have emotional and behavioural difficulties. Semi- structured interviews were undertaken with 17 foster carers employed by a local authority or an Independent Fostering Agency. A grounded theory methodology within a social constructionist framework was used to develop a new theoretical understanding from the data. A central storyline of ‘keeping your head above water’ emerged and appeared to encapsulate daily struggles and ways of managing. Categories which contributed to this were ‘becoming isolated’ from other professionals, ‘role ambiguity’ regarding the multiple meanings attached to being a foster carer, ‘making sense of emotional and behavioural difficulties’ highlighting a need to understand the children cared for, ‘a focus on behaviours’ illuminating approaches to parenting and ‘unmet emotional needs’ which is a possible consequence of focussing on children’s behaviours. The emergent theory may hold potential for developing psychological formulations, interventions and training programmes for foster carers. Suggestions for future support are put forward based on the new theoretical framework. Applications of the findings to Counselling Psychology are discussed in detail.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.subjectFoster carersen_GB
dc.subjectattachment theoryen_GB
dc.subjectemotional and behavioural difficultiesen_GB
dc.subjectgrounded theoryen_GB
dc.titleThe support needs of foster carers who look after young people with emotional and behavioural difficultiesen_GB
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnameDCounsPsychen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
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