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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Applied Sciences > Research Centre in Applied Sciences  > Plant and Environmental Research Group > Butterfly Activity in a Residential Garden

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29675
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Title: Butterfly Activity in a Residential Garden
Authors: Young, Christopher
Citation: Urban Habitats, 5 (May 2008).
Publisher: Brooklyn, NY: Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Journal: Urban Habitats
Issue Date: 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29675
Additional Links: http://www.urbanhabitats.org/v05n01/butterfly_full.html
Abstract: Butterflies are a highly visible, well-loved, and well-studied part of Britain's native fauna, yet there is still very little known about how butterflies use one of the country's most commonly available habitats, the residential garden. Studies in a Wolverhampton (UK) garden demonstrate that the majority of individuals use these spaces as movement routes through the urban matrix. Of 516 observed individual visits by butterflies over three recording seasons (2000–2002), only 13.8% involved a stop for some purpose. The duration of these visits was characteristically short, with a mean visit time of nine seconds. Individuals tended to fly through the study garden using distinct entry and exit points largely dictated by variations in structure within the study garden and in the immediately surrounding gardens. Individual garden use by butterflies would therefore seem to be defined as much by structural imperatives as by availability of nectar- or food-plant species. When considered as systems of interconnected green spaces on the level of the housing block (defined as a continuous area of residential land use bounded by infrastructure or contrasting land uses) and of the urban area as a whole, residential gardens represent an extraordinarily valuable and dynamic component of the urban habitat.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: Follow the additional link to access the full text online (free access)
Keywords: Butterflies
Vegetation structure
Flight paths
Urban green space
Gardens, residential
West Midlands
housing block
Wolverhampton
Ethology
ISSN: 1541-7115
Appears in Collections: Plant and Environmental Research Group

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