Investigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Milling an Austenitic Stainless Steel and En32 Low Carbon Steel

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29639
Title:
Investigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Milling an Austenitic Stainless Steel and En32 Low Carbon Steel
Authors:
Stanford, Mark; Lister, Paul M.
Abstract:
Abstract: Purpose – Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting have considerable environmental impact. Inert gaseous metal cutting environments were investigated with the aim of removing soluble oil cutting fluids from metal cutting operations. Design/methodology/approach – Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an austenitic stainless steel and En32 low carbon steel material was milled in a range of different cutting environments. Tool life was measured for tests carried out in a number of gaseous environments and results were then compared with test results from conventional flood cutting environments. Findings – Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a considerable flank wear reduction has been recorded using CVD coated tooling. Additionally flood coolant environments have been seen to promote chemical wear after the initial breakdown of coatings leading to rapid flank wear during milling of both En32 and austenitic stainless steel. Research limitations/implications – Only a limited number of work/tool material combinations have been investigated. A more detailed and exhaustive investigation is required to ascertain the scope of the improvements for a range of tool work combinations. This will assist in understanding the underlying reasoning for the tool life enhancement reported. Practical implications – All experimentation carried out is industrially reproducible. This work, therefore, proposes an environmentally clean alternative to the use of emulsified oils in metal cutting operations in order to exploit cost savings and improved operator working environments. Originality/value – Distinct operational performance improvements have been demonstrated in the form of extended tool life for metal cutting operations performed in a non-polluting cutting environment. These findings could herald widespread advantages within the metal cutting community. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)
Citation:
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, 57(2): 73-79
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Journal:
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29639
DOI:
10.1108/00368790510583384
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1463300
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
A 50% flank wear reduction was recorded using CVD coated tooling in nitrogen rich environments. The nuclear and aerospace industries have expressed interest in the results specifically HC Stark Ltd and Smiths Aerospace: David Rowe, Technical Manager, H C Starck Ltd, Horndon Business Park, Brentwood, Essex, CM13 3XD, Tel: +44 (0) 1277 814210 Jamie Quinton, Manufacturing Engineer, Smiths Aerospace Actuation Systems, Wolverhampton, Wobaston Road, Wolverhampton, WV9 5EW, Tel: +44 (0) 1902 397700.
ISSN:
00368792
Appears in Collections:
Engineering and Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStanford, Mark-
dc.contributor.authorLister, Paul M.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-06T15:28:01Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-06T15:28:01Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationIndustrial Lubrication and Tribology, 57(2): 73-79en
dc.identifier.issn00368792-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/00368790510583384-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29639-
dc.descriptionA 50% flank wear reduction was recorded using CVD coated tooling in nitrogen rich environments. The nuclear and aerospace industries have expressed interest in the results specifically HC Stark Ltd and Smiths Aerospace: David Rowe, Technical Manager, H C Starck Ltd, Horndon Business Park, Brentwood, Essex, CM13 3XD, Tel: +44 (0) 1277 814210 Jamie Quinton, Manufacturing Engineer, Smiths Aerospace Actuation Systems, Wolverhampton, Wobaston Road, Wolverhampton, WV9 5EW, Tel: +44 (0) 1902 397700.en
dc.description.abstractAbstract: Purpose – Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting have considerable environmental impact. Inert gaseous metal cutting environments were investigated with the aim of removing soluble oil cutting fluids from metal cutting operations. Design/methodology/approach – Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an austenitic stainless steel and En32 low carbon steel material was milled in a range of different cutting environments. Tool life was measured for tests carried out in a number of gaseous environments and results were then compared with test results from conventional flood cutting environments. Findings – Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a considerable flank wear reduction has been recorded using CVD coated tooling. Additionally flood coolant environments have been seen to promote chemical wear after the initial breakdown of coatings leading to rapid flank wear during milling of both En32 and austenitic stainless steel. Research limitations/implications – Only a limited number of work/tool material combinations have been investigated. A more detailed and exhaustive investigation is required to ascertain the scope of the improvements for a range of tool work combinations. This will assist in understanding the underlying reasoning for the tool life enhancement reported. Practical implications – All experimentation carried out is industrially reproducible. This work, therefore, proposes an environmentally clean alternative to the use of emulsified oils in metal cutting operations in order to exploit cost savings and improved operator working environments. Originality/value – Distinct operational performance improvements have been demonstrated in the form of extended tool life for metal cutting operations performed in a non-polluting cutting environment. These findings could herald widespread advantages within the metal cutting community. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1463300en
dc.subjectEngineering technologyen
dc.subjectCoolantsen
dc.subjectCutting fluidsen
dc.subjectMaterial removal processesen
dc.subjectFluid dynamicsen
dc.subjectEn32 steelen
dc.subjectMetal cuttingen
dc.subjectEnvironmental pollutionen
dc.subjectLubricantsen
dc.subjectAerospace applicationsen
dc.subjectNuclear industriesen
dc.subjectInert gasen
dc.titleInvestigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Milling an Austenitic Stainless Steel and En32 Low Carbon Steelen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Lubrication and Tribologyen
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