University of Wolverhampton
Browse
Collection All
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
Listed communities
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet
bullet

Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Technology > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Engineering and Technology > The Future Role of Metalworking Fluids in Metal Cutting Operations

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29638
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!



Title: The Future Role of Metalworking Fluids in Metal Cutting Operations
Authors: Stanford, Mark
Lister, Paul M.
Citation: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, 54(1): 11-19
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Journal: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology
Issue Date: 2002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29638
DOI: 10.1108/00368790210415329
Additional Links: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1453994
Abstract: As more stringent environmental legislation is enforced throughout Europe manufacturing businesses, employing metal cutting processes, can no longer ignore the growing importance of environmental aspects relating to cutting fluids. Businesses, through market forces, are being forced into offering a “clean solution” to the metal cutting processes which they operate. Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting, have considerable environmental impact. There is a need therefore to understand the role of cutting fluids within the cutting process in order to evaluate possible environmentally friendly alternatives to the use of cutting fluids. In order to achieve this the operating environment in which the process is being carried out, and the consequences of removing the cutting fluid from the process altogether has to be assessed. This paper therefore, reflects on the role of cutting fluid and the implications of their use. Viable methods of reducing cutting fluid consumption are also reported, together with efficient methods of cutting fluid utilisation (e.g. minimum quantity delivery systems). Finally, the difficulties experienced in removing cutting fluids from the metal cutting process are highlighted through the consideration of dry cutting technologies. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: The case for establishing viable methods of reducing cutting fluid consumption, through their replacement by gaseous coolants is presented. This paper formed the basis of significant research presented in Stanford’s other outputs. The industrial interest that evolved during the work is driven by many factors including environmental considerations: fluid disposal can result in the accumulation of dissolved nitrogen compounds causing eutrophication of ground and surface water; incineration forms nitrogen oxides and carcinogens in the form of dioxins; and cost, in that the use and disposal of cutting fluids forms 17% of the cost of cutting operations.
Keywords: Cutting fluids
Metal cutting
Environmental pollution
Coolants
Engineering technology
Fluid dynamics
Material removal processes
Inert gas
ISSN: 00368792
Appears in Collections: Engineering and Technology

Files in This Item:

There are no files associated with this item.



All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Fairtrade - Guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers

University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY

Course enquiries: 0800 953 3222, General enquiries: 01902 321000,
Email: enquiries@wlv.ac.uk | Freedom of Information | Disclaimer and copyright | Website feedback | The University as a charity

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies