Investigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Turning En32 Steel

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29635
Title:
Investigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Turning En32 Steel
Authors:
Stanford, Mark; Lister, Paul M.
Abstract:
New environmental legislation is forcing companies to realign their use of metalworking fluids in favour of non-polluting cutting environments that will return acceptable tool wear rates and reduced costs. Studies have been undertaken to determine the effectiveness of various environments on tool wear, in order to either reduce or even eliminate totally, the dependency on flood coolants. Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an EN32 case hardening steel material was turned in a range of different cutting environments and tool life measured. Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a 55 per cent flank wear reduction has been recorded using uncoated tooling. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)
Citation:
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, 56(2): 114-121
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Journal:
Industrial Lubrication and Tribology
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29635
DOI:
10.1108/00368790410524065
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=874637
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
A nitrogen gas rich environment produced a 55% reduction in flank wear on uncoated tooling when compared with conventional flood cutting environments. The work led to in-kind support from the BOC Gases (Dr Mark Cole at BOC Gasses +44 10902692084) and Sandvik UK Ltd. Interest has also been expressed by Boeing and Kennametal (USA).
ISSN:
00368792
Appears in Collections:
Engineering and Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStanford, Mark-
dc.contributor.authorLister, Paul M.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-06T15:19:40Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-06T15:19:40Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationIndustrial Lubrication and Tribology, 56(2): 114-121en
dc.identifier.issn00368792-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/00368790410524065-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29635-
dc.descriptionA nitrogen gas rich environment produced a 55% reduction in flank wear on uncoated tooling when compared with conventional flood cutting environments. The work led to in-kind support from the BOC Gases (Dr Mark Cole at BOC Gasses +44 10902692084) and Sandvik UK Ltd. Interest has also been expressed by Boeing and Kennametal (USA).en
dc.description.abstractNew environmental legislation is forcing companies to realign their use of metalworking fluids in favour of non-polluting cutting environments that will return acceptable tool wear rates and reduced costs. Studies have been undertaken to determine the effectiveness of various environments on tool wear, in order to either reduce or even eliminate totally, the dependency on flood coolants. Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an EN32 case hardening steel material was turned in a range of different cutting environments and tool life measured. Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a 55 per cent flank wear reduction has been recorded using uncoated tooling. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=874637en
dc.subjectFluid dynamicsen
dc.subjectMaterial removal processesen
dc.subjectEn32 steelen
dc.subjectCutting fluidsen
dc.subjectMetal cuttingen
dc.subjectEnvironmental pollutionen
dc.subjectCoolantsen
dc.subjectEngineering technologyen
dc.titleInvestigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Turning En32 Steelen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Lubrication and Tribologyen
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