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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Technology > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Engineering and Technology > Investigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Turning En32 Steel

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29635
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Title: Investigation into the Relationship between Tool-Wear and Cutting Environments when Turning En32 Steel
Authors: Stanford, Mark
Lister, Paul M.
Citation: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, 56(2): 114-121
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Journal: Industrial Lubrication and Tribology
Issue Date: 2004
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29635
DOI: 10.1108/00368790410524065
Additional Links: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=874637
Abstract: New environmental legislation is forcing companies to realign their use of metalworking fluids in favour of non-polluting cutting environments that will return acceptable tool wear rates and reduced costs. Studies have been undertaken to determine the effectiveness of various environments on tool wear, in order to either reduce or even eliminate totally, the dependency on flood coolants. Industrially reproducible cutting tests were devised, where an EN32 case hardening steel material was turned in a range of different cutting environments and tool life measured. Low oxygen gaseous environments were compared with conventional cutting environments and a 55 per cent flank wear reduction has been recorded using uncoated tooling. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: A nitrogen gas rich environment produced a 55% reduction in flank wear on uncoated tooling when compared with conventional flood cutting environments. The work led to in-kind support from the BOC Gases (Dr Mark Cole at BOC Gasses +44 10902692084) and Sandvik UK Ltd. Interest has also been expressed by Boeing and Kennametal (USA).
Keywords: Fluid dynamics
Material removal processes
En32 steel
Cutting fluids
Metal cutting
Environmental pollution
Coolants
Engineering technology
ISSN: 00368792
Appears in Collections: Engineering and Technology

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