2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29603
Title:
Energy Absorption Capacity of Prismatic Cellular Metals
Authors:
Kaaz, Michael; Hall, Frank Richard; Spence, J.; Bauer, H.
Abstract:
In this study the energy absorption capacity of prismatic cellular materials were examined using 2D Finite-Element (FE) simulations. The energy absorption capacity of many core topologies has been predicted under quasi-static compression. Subsequently, the dynamic impact behaviour of one of these structures, with good energy absorption characteristics, has been assessed for a range of impact velocities from 10 to 1000 m/s. As the impact speed increases, different deformation modes are noticed and the effects of stress wave propagation become more important. The importance of these studies is identified for the future development of lightweight, and impact-resistant, structured materials.
Citation:
International Journal of Engineering Simulation, 8(2): 17-23
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Journal:
International Journal of Engineering Simulation
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29603
Additional Links:
http://www.intjes.co.uk/vol8num2/vol8num2.html#
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
There is a growing interest in developing ultra-lightweight armour for agile vehicles. The energy absorption capacity of candidate cellular materials with a range of prismatic structures has been studied while undergoing different impact velocities. The prismatic structures studied are appropriate to bullet resistant materials. Energy absorption per unit mass, and the distribution of plastic strain, has been used to assess the structures. This work was in collaboration with BAE SYSTEMS and led to a DTI: Competition of Ideas grant award (£300k).
ISSN:
1468-1137
Appears in Collections:
Engineering and Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKaaz, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorHall, Frank Richard-
dc.contributor.authorSpence, J.-
dc.contributor.authorBauer, H.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-06T13:49:52Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-06T13:49:52Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Engineering Simulation, 8(2): 17-23en
dc.identifier.issn1468-1137-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29603-
dc.descriptionThere is a growing interest in developing ultra-lightweight armour for agile vehicles. The energy absorption capacity of candidate cellular materials with a range of prismatic structures has been studied while undergoing different impact velocities. The prismatic structures studied are appropriate to bullet resistant materials. Energy absorption per unit mass, and the distribution of plastic strain, has been used to assess the structures. This work was in collaboration with BAE SYSTEMS and led to a DTI: Competition of Ideas grant award (£300k).en
dc.description.abstractIn this study the energy absorption capacity of prismatic cellular materials were examined using 2D Finite-Element (FE) simulations. The energy absorption capacity of many core topologies has been predicted under quasi-static compression. Subsequently, the dynamic impact behaviour of one of these structures, with good energy absorption characteristics, has been assessed for a range of impact velocities from 10 to 1000 m/s. As the impact speed increases, different deformation modes are noticed and the effects of stress wave propagation become more important. The importance of these studies is identified for the future development of lightweight, and impact-resistant, structured materials.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.intjes.co.uk/vol8num2/vol8num2.html#en
dc.subjectCellular metalsen
dc.subjectEnergy absorptionen
dc.subjectImpacten
dc.subjectStress wave propagationen
dc.subjectBullet resistant materialsen
dc.subjectPlastic strainen
dc.subjectSimulationen
dc.subjectEngineering technologyen
dc.titleEnergy Absorption Capacity of Prismatic Cellular Metalsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Engineering Simulationen
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