5.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29583
Title:
Demystified. Human endogenous retroviruses.
Authors:
Nelson, Paul N.; Carnegie, P.R.; Martin, Jan H.; Ejtehadi, H. Davari; Hooley, Paul; Roden, Denise A.; Rowland-Jones, S.; Warren, Phil; Astley, S.J.; Murray, Paul G.
Abstract:
Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are a family of viruses within our genome with similarities to present day exogenous retroviruses. HERVs have been inherited by successive generations and it is possible that some have conferred biological benefits. However, several HERVs have been implicated in certain cancers and autoimmune diseases. This article demystifies these retroviruses by providing an insight into HERVs, their means of classification, and a synopsis of HERVs implicated in cancer and autoimmunity. Furthermore, the biological roles of HERVs are explored.
Citation:
Journal of Clinical Pathology: Molecular Pathology, 56 (1): 11-18
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing
Journal:
Journal of Clinical Pathology: Molecular Pathology
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29583
PubMed ID:
12560456
Additional Links:
http://mp.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/56/1/11
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1366-8714
Appears in Collections:
Cancer Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Paul N.-
dc.contributor.authorCarnegie, P.R.-
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Jan H.-
dc.contributor.authorEjtehadi, H. Davari-
dc.contributor.authorHooley, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorRoden, Denise A.-
dc.contributor.authorRowland-Jones, S.-
dc.contributor.authorWarren, Phil-
dc.contributor.authorAstley, S.J.-
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Paul G.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-05T13:12:50Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-05T13:12:50Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Pathology: Molecular Pathology, 56 (1): 11-18en
dc.identifier.issn1366-8714-
dc.identifier.pmid12560456-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29583-
dc.description.abstractHuman endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are a family of viruses within our genome with similarities to present day exogenous retroviruses. HERVs have been inherited by successive generations and it is possible that some have conferred biological benefits. However, several HERVs have been implicated in certain cancers and autoimmune diseases. This article demystifies these retroviruses by providing an insight into HERVs, their means of classification, and a synopsis of HERVs implicated in cancer and autoimmunity. Furthermore, the biological roles of HERVs are explored.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://mp.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/56/1/11en
dc.subjectHuman Endogenous Retrovirusesen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectAutoimmunityen
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viralen
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Viralen
dc.subject.meshAutoimmune Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshCodon, Nonsenseen
dc.subject.meshDNAen
dc.subject.meshDNA Transposable Elementsen
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Viralen
dc.subject.meshEndogenous Retrovirusesen
dc.subject.meshGenes, Viralen
dc.subject.meshGenome, Humanen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshPeptidesen
dc.subject.meshRNA, Messengeren
dc.subject.meshTerminal Repeat Sequencesen
dc.subject.meshTranscription, Geneticen
dc.titleDemystified. Human endogenous retroviruses.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Clinical Pathology: Molecular Pathologyen

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