2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29490
Title:
Oxygen uptake during modern dance class, rehearsal, and performance.
Authors:
Wyon, Matthew A.; Abt, Grant; Redding, Emma; Head, Andrew; Craig, N.; Sharp, C.
Abstract:
The aim of the present study was to examine whether the workload, expressed in oxygen uptake and heart rate, during dance class and rehearsal prepared the dancer for performance. Previous research on the demands of class and performance has been affected by equipment limitations and could only provide limited insight into the physiological demands placed on the dancer. The present study noted that dance performance had significantly greater mean oxygen uptake and heart rate than noted in both class and rehearsal (p < 0.05). Further analysis noted that, during class and rehearsal, heart rates were rarely within the aerobic training zone (60-90%HRmax, where HRmax is the maximum heart rate). Dance performance placed a greater demand on the aerobic and anaerobic glycolytic energy systems than seen during class and rehearsal, which placed a greater emphasis on the adenosine triphosphate-creatine phosphate system. Practical implications suggest the need to supplement training within dance companies to overcome this deficit in training demand.
Citation:
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 18 (3): 646-649
Publisher:
Allen Press
Journal:
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29490
PubMed ID:
15320648
Additional Links:
http://apt.allenpress.com/perlserv/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1519%2F13082.1&ct=1
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1064-8011
Appears in Collections:
Sport, Exercise and Health Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.-
dc.contributor.authorAbt, Grant-
dc.contributor.authorRedding, Emma-
dc.contributor.authorHead, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorCraig, N.-
dc.contributor.authorSharp, C.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04T13:41:13Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-04T13:41:13Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 18 (3): 646-649en
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011-
dc.identifier.pmid15320648-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29490-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to examine whether the workload, expressed in oxygen uptake and heart rate, during dance class and rehearsal prepared the dancer for performance. Previous research on the demands of class and performance has been affected by equipment limitations and could only provide limited insight into the physiological demands placed on the dancer. The present study noted that dance performance had significantly greater mean oxygen uptake and heart rate than noted in both class and rehearsal (p < 0.05). Further analysis noted that, during class and rehearsal, heart rates were rarely within the aerobic training zone (60-90%HRmax, where HRmax is the maximum heart rate). Dance performance placed a greater demand on the aerobic and anaerobic glycolytic energy systems than seen during class and rehearsal, which placed a greater emphasis on the adenosine triphosphate-creatine phosphate system. Practical implications suggest the need to supplement training within dance companies to overcome this deficit in training demand.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAllen Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://apt.allenpress.com/perlserv/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1519%2F13082.1&ct=1en
dc.subjectTraining demanden
dc.subjectIntervention strategiesen
dc.subjectTelemetric gas analysisen
dc.subjectDance-
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshDancingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHeart Rateen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen
dc.subject.meshPhysical Education and Trainingen
dc.titleOxygen uptake during modern dance class, rehearsal, and performance.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Researchen
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