Cholesterol-bile salt vesicles as potential delivery vehicles for drug and vaccine delivery.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29444
Title:
Cholesterol-bile salt vesicles as potential delivery vehicles for drug and vaccine delivery.
Authors:
Martin, C.; Thongborisute, J.; Takeuchi, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawashima, Y.; Alpar, H.O.
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to further investigate the interactions between cholesterol (CH) and mixed bile salts (BS) (sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate) and their suitability for drug and vaccine delivery. Insulin was used as a model protein to assess the ability of CH:BS vesicles to entrap a therapeutically relevant macromolecule. The association of protein (FITC-insulin) with the CH:BS structure was confirmed with fluorescence microscopy, and the overall morphology of the vesicles was examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results demonstrate that the nature of the vesicles formed between CH and BS is dependent not only on the concentration of BS but also on the increasing CH concentration leading to CH crystal formation.
Citation:
International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 298(2): 339-343
Publisher:
Elsevier Science Direct
Journal:
International Journal of Pharmaceutics
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29444
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.03.038
PubMed ID:
15967607
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T7W-4GFCPVT-1&_user=1644469&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000054077&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1644469&md5=af750868585f0a5f9ff74c005d4e33a7
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0378-5173
Appears in Collections:
Pharmacy and Natural Products Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartin, C.-
dc.contributor.authorThongborisute, J.-
dc.contributor.authorTakeuchi, H.-
dc.contributor.authorYamamoto, H.-
dc.contributor.authorKawashima, Y.-
dc.contributor.authorAlpar, H.O.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04T10:16:49Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-04T10:16:49Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics, 298(2): 339-343en
dc.identifier.issn0378-5173-
dc.identifier.pmid15967607-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijpharm.2005.03.038-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29444-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to further investigate the interactions between cholesterol (CH) and mixed bile salts (BS) (sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate) and their suitability for drug and vaccine delivery. Insulin was used as a model protein to assess the ability of CH:BS vesicles to entrap a therapeutically relevant macromolecule. The association of protein (FITC-insulin) with the CH:BS structure was confirmed with fluorescence microscopy, and the overall morphology of the vesicles was examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results demonstrate that the nature of the vesicles formed between CH and BS is dependent not only on the concentration of BS but also on the increasing CH concentration leading to CH crystal formation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier Science Directen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T7W-4GFCPVT-1&_user=1644469&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000054077&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1644469&md5=af750868585f0a5f9ff74c005d4e33a7-
dc.subjectCholesterolen
dc.subjectVaccine deliveryen
dc.subject.meshBile Acids and Saltsen
dc.subject.meshCholesterolen
dc.subject.meshDrug Delivery Systemsen
dc.subject.meshElectrochemistryen
dc.subject.meshFluorescein-5-isothiocyanateen
dc.subject.meshInsulinen
dc.subject.meshMicellesen
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Atomic Forceen
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Fluorescenceen
dc.subject.meshVaccinesen
dc.subject.meshVehiclesen
dc.titleCholesterol-bile salt vesicles as potential delivery vehicles for drug and vaccine delivery.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Pharmaceuticsen

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