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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > Research Institutes > Research Institute in Healthcare Science > Psychology of Health Research Group  > Subclinical delusional ideation and a self-reference bias in everyday reasoning.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29442
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Title: Subclinical delusional ideation and a self-reference bias in everyday reasoning.
Authors: Galbraith, Niall
Manktelow, Ken I.
Morris, Neil
Citation: British Journal of Psychology, 2008, 99 (Pt 1): 29-44
Publisher: British Psychological Society
Journal: British Journal of Psychology
Issue Date: 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29442
DOI: 10.1348/000712607X204317
PubMed ID: 17535473
Additional Links: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpsoc/bjp/2008/00000099/00000001/art00002?token=00541f43350ac8ca93015517e2a46762c475f5d367646707b3a7b6d24673f7b2f27375f2a72752d70407
Abstract: Previous studies (e.g. Moller & Husby, 2000; Blackwood et al., 2004) have revealed that delusional thinking is accompanied by an exaggerated focus upon the self and upon stimuli that are perceived to be related to the self. The objective was to examine whether those high in subclinical delusional ideation exhibit a heightened tendency for self-reference. Using a mixed design, healthy individuals, classified into high- and low-scoring groups on the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (Peters, Day, & Garety, 1996), were compared on everyday reasoning tasks across three experiments. High-PDI scorers, in contrast to the low-PDI group, rated self-referent objections to everyday arguments as stronger than other-referent objections and formulated more self-referent assertion-based objections to everyday arguments. The findings support the notion that subclinical delusional ideation is linked to a self-reference bias, which is evident in the sort of everyday thinking that people engage in when forming or evaluating their beliefs and which may contribute to delusion formation.
Type: Article
Language: en
MeSH: Adult
Cognition
Decision Making
Delusions
Female
Humans
Male
Self Concept
ISSN: 0007-1269
Appears in Collections: Psychology of Health Research Group

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