The Relationships between Indoor and Outdoor Respirable Particulate Matter: Meteorology, Chemistry and Personal Exposure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29360
Title:
The Relationships between Indoor and Outdoor Respirable Particulate Matter: Meteorology, Chemistry and Personal Exposure
Authors:
Shilton, Vaughan F.; Giess, Paul; Mitchell, David J.; Williams, Craig D.
Abstract:
Respirable particulate matter was collected inside and outside of a building located in Wolverhampton city centre during the same time period between 19/9/00 and 1/5/01. A total of 103 pairs of indoor and outdoor mea surements were made using Casella personal dust moni tors. The building monitored was located in a small street canyon produced by 4- and 5-storey buildings on both sides of the road. The road is the main approach road to a major bus station and is used by large numbers of heavy-duty diesel vehicles each day. The mean con centration for outdoor samples was 27.6 and 9.8 µg.m-3 for indoor samples. The mean indoor/outdoor ratio for this period was 0.4 (±0.02 SE). Meteorological variables including wind speed, wind direction and precipitation were measured at a nearby urban monitoring station. A greater wind speed caused an increase in the quantity of outdoor generated particulates penetrating indoors. Wind direction affected both indoor and outdoor particu late concentrations, with lower concentrations being ob served when the wind direction was parallel to the street canyon. The indoor/outdoor ratio also showed a de crease during parallel wind conditions. During days with high amounts of precipitation, the concentration of par ticulates, both indoors and outdoors, decreased signifi cantly. The personal exposure of a building occupant was measured for 20 working days in conjunction with outdoor and indoor measurements. Personal exposure concentrations were well correlated with indoor concen trations (r2 = 0.98). Forty of the indoor and outdoor partic ulate samples of dust were chemically analysed for sul phate, nitrate, chloride, zinc, copper, manganese and aluminium to determine any indoor/outdoor relation ships of particulate chemistry and any interrelationships between the analytes. (Sage Publications)
Citation:
Indoor and Built Environment, 11(5): 266-274
Publisher:
Sage Publications
Journal:
Indoor and Built Environment
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/29360
DOI:
10.1159/000066526
Additional Links:
http://ibe.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/11/5/266
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1420326X; 14230070
Appears in Collections:
Construction and Infrastructure

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShilton, Vaughan F.-
dc.contributor.authorGiess, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, David J.-
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Craig D.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-02T14:59:11Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-02T14:59:11Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationIndoor and Built Environment, 11(5): 266-274en
dc.identifier.issn1420326X-
dc.identifier.issn14230070-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000066526-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29360-
dc.description.abstractRespirable particulate matter was collected inside and outside of a building located in Wolverhampton city centre during the same time period between 19/9/00 and 1/5/01. A total of 103 pairs of indoor and outdoor mea surements were made using Casella personal dust moni tors. The building monitored was located in a small street canyon produced by 4- and 5-storey buildings on both sides of the road. The road is the main approach road to a major bus station and is used by large numbers of heavy-duty diesel vehicles each day. The mean con centration for outdoor samples was 27.6 and 9.8 µg.m-3 for indoor samples. The mean indoor/outdoor ratio for this period was 0.4 (±0.02 SE). Meteorological variables including wind speed, wind direction and precipitation were measured at a nearby urban monitoring station. A greater wind speed caused an increase in the quantity of outdoor generated particulates penetrating indoors. Wind direction affected both indoor and outdoor particu late concentrations, with lower concentrations being ob served when the wind direction was parallel to the street canyon. The indoor/outdoor ratio also showed a de crease during parallel wind conditions. During days with high amounts of precipitation, the concentration of par ticulates, both indoors and outdoors, decreased signifi cantly. The personal exposure of a building occupant was measured for 20 working days in conjunction with outdoor and indoor measurements. Personal exposure concentrations were well correlated with indoor concen trations (r2 = 0.98). Forty of the indoor and outdoor partic ulate samples of dust were chemically analysed for sul phate, nitrate, chloride, zinc, copper, manganese and aluminium to determine any indoor/outdoor relation ships of particulate chemistry and any interrelationships between the analytes. (Sage Publications)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ibe.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/11/5/266en
dc.subjectParticulate matteren
dc.subjectAir pollutionen
dc.subjectMeteorologyen
dc.subjectChemistryen
dc.subjectEnvironmental pollutionen
dc.subjectPollutionen
dc.subjectWest Midlandsen
dc.subjectBlack Countryen
dc.subjectWolverhamptonen
dc.subjectVehicle pollutionen
dc.subjectCombustion product gasen
dc.subjectDusten
dc.subjectDiesel emissionsen
dc.subjectFossil fuel combustionen
dc.subjectDiesel combustionen
dc.subjectHuman respirationen
dc.subjectMidlands region-
dc.subjectWolverhampton-
dc.titleThe Relationships between Indoor and Outdoor Respirable Particulate Matter: Meteorology, Chemistry and Personal Exposureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIndoor and Built Environmenten
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