The Effect of Coal and Diesel Particulates on the Weathering Loss of Portland Limestone in an Urban Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/28956
Title:
The Effect of Coal and Diesel Particulates on the Weathering Loss of Portland Limestone in an Urban Environment
Authors:
Searle, David E.; Mitchell, David J.
Abstract:
Due to reductions in domestic usage, legislation and changes in fuel use, coal derived particulates in the UK urban atmosphere have been significantly reduced. However, a large increase in road usage and an expansion in the use of diesel engines, has meant that the majority of particulates, now present in the urban atmosphere, originate from vehicle exhausts. Particulate matter, resulting from coal combustion, has been recorded as being present in black patinas observed on some historic stone buildings and monuments and has been associated with accelerated weathering of stone surfaces as a result of enhanced gypsum formation. In contrast, the effects of particulates resulting from vehicle exhaust on stone are much less understood. To investigate this, a comparative study was undertaken using the technique of microcatchments under ambient atmospheric conditions. This compared the elemental composition and volume of precipitation runoff from Portland Limestone coated with three different particulate treatments. Treatments consisted of coal and diesel particulates, both separately and in combination. Combining these treatments attempts to investigate any synergistic effects that may occur when coal derived particulates are overlain by layers formed by particulates from more contemporary sources. It was found that diesel-coated samples were much darker in appearance and showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the overall rate of weathering loss when compared to untreated samples. Microcatchment runoff volume was reduced from diesel-coated Portland Limestone compared to untreated stone. Enhanced surface temperatures may be increasing the rate of moisture loss from the pore network between rainfall events. Since, generally, the pores must be full before runoff can occur, the reduction may be due to the differential volume of empty pore space between diesel-coated and untreated Portland Limestone.
Citation:
Science of The Total Environment, 370(1): 207-223
Publisher:
Amsterdam: Elsevier
Journal:
Science of The Total Environment
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/28956
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2006.07.005
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V78-4KJTNCN-2&_user=10&_coverDate=10%2F15%2F2006&_alid=744539512&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_cdi=5836&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_ct=1&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=791a61d2c38286bb53f4acc2ad471195
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
00489697
Appears in Collections:
Construction and Infrastructure

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSearle, David E.-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, David J.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-29T15:46:52Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-29T15:46:52Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationScience of The Total Environment, 370(1): 207-223en
dc.identifier.issn00489697-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2006.07.005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/28956-
dc.description.abstractDue to reductions in domestic usage, legislation and changes in fuel use, coal derived particulates in the UK urban atmosphere have been significantly reduced. However, a large increase in road usage and an expansion in the use of diesel engines, has meant that the majority of particulates, now present in the urban atmosphere, originate from vehicle exhausts. Particulate matter, resulting from coal combustion, has been recorded as being present in black patinas observed on some historic stone buildings and monuments and has been associated with accelerated weathering of stone surfaces as a result of enhanced gypsum formation. In contrast, the effects of particulates resulting from vehicle exhaust on stone are much less understood. To investigate this, a comparative study was undertaken using the technique of microcatchments under ambient atmospheric conditions. This compared the elemental composition and volume of precipitation runoff from Portland Limestone coated with three different particulate treatments. Treatments consisted of coal and diesel particulates, both separately and in combination. Combining these treatments attempts to investigate any synergistic effects that may occur when coal derived particulates are overlain by layers formed by particulates from more contemporary sources. It was found that diesel-coated samples were much darker in appearance and showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the overall rate of weathering loss when compared to untreated samples. Microcatchment runoff volume was reduced from diesel-coated Portland Limestone compared to untreated stone. Enhanced surface temperatures may be increasing the rate of moisture loss from the pore network between rainfall events. Since, generally, the pores must be full before runoff can occur, the reduction may be due to the differential volume of empty pore space between diesel-coated and untreated Portland Limestone.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmsterdam: Elsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V78-4KJTNCN-2&_user=10&_coverDate=10%2F15%2F2006&_alid=744539512&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_cdi=5836&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_ct=1&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=791a61d2c38286bb53f4acc2ad471195en
dc.subjectCoal combustionen
dc.subjectDiesel combustionen
dc.subjectParticulate matteren
dc.subjectMicrocatchmentsen
dc.subjectWeathering lossen
dc.subjectUKen
dc.subjectCoal derived particulatesen
dc.subjectPortland Limestoneen
dc.subjectFossil fuel combustionen
dc.subjectCombustion product gasen
dc.subjectEnvironmental pollutionen
dc.subjectPollutionen
dc.subjectAir pollutionen
dc.subjectVehicle pollutionen
dc.subjectStone-
dc.titleThe Effect of Coal and Diesel Particulates on the Weathering Loss of Portland Limestone in an Urban Environmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScience of The Total Environmenten
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