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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Technology > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Construction and Infrastructure > Customary Landholding Institutions and Housing Development in Urban Centres of Ghana : Case Studies of Kumasi and Wa

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/28833
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Title: Customary Landholding Institutions and Housing Development in Urban Centres of Ghana : Case Studies of Kumasi and Wa
Authors: Abdulai, Raymond Talinbe
Ndekugri, Issaka E.
Citation: Habitat International, 31(2): 257-267
Publisher: Amsterdam: Elsevier
Journal: Habitat International
Issue Date: 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/28833
DOI: 10.1016/j.habitatint.2007.02.004
Additional Links: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V9H-4NHM6DM-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=10362368577335dd78d50a84db3bb73e
Abstract: In Ghana, land is vested in families and chiefs in the traditional land sector. These corporate bodies, referred to as customary landholding institutions control over 90% of the total land area in the country. The institutions therefore govern access to land. Urban centres in Ghana are plagued with a plethora of problems and one of them is inadequate housing. The urban housing problem is partly attributed to the existence and operation of the institutions. The customary landholding system is perceived as communal landownership, which does not permit individual ownership. It is thus argued that the system does not provide incentives for investing in housing development. This paper reports on a study carried out to test the assertion that the system does not permit individual ownership using two urban centres as case studies. The analysis shows that the operation of the institutions permits individual landownership. The traditional landownership system cannot therefore be the cause of the urban housing problem based on the premise that it does not permit individual ownership of land rights.
Type: Article
Language: en
Keywords: Traditional landholding institutions
Communal landholding
Land rights
Housing development
Ghana
Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa
Land ownership
Economic development
Land tenure
Property rights
Individual ownership
Socioeconomics
Urbanisation
Urban housing
ISSN: 0197-3975
Appears in Collections: Construction and Infrastructure

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