2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27334
Title:
Interpreting social science link analysis research: A theoretical framework
Authors:
Thelwall, Mike
Abstract:
Link analysis in various forms is now an established technique in many different subjects, reflecting the perceived importance of links and of the Web. A critical but very difficult issue is how to interpret the results of social science link analyses. It is argued that the dynamic nature of the Web, its lack of quality control, and the online proliferation of copying and imitation mean that methodologies operating within a highly positivist, quantitative framework are ineffective. Conversely, the sheer variety of the Web makes application of qualitative methodologies and pure reason very problematic to large-scale studies. Methodology triangulation is consequently advocated, in combination with a warning that the Web is incapable of giving definitive answers to large-scale link analysis research questions concerning social factors underlying link creation. Finally, it is claimed that although theoretical frameworks are appropriate for guiding research, a Theory of Link Analysis is not possible.
Citation:
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57 (1): 60-68
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27334
DOI:
10.1002/asi.20253
Additional Links:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112127295/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
15322882; 15322890
Appears in Collections:
Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mike-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-21T10:30:11Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-21T10:30:11Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57 (1): 60-68en
dc.identifier.issn15322882-
dc.identifier.issn15322890-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asi.20253-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27334-
dc.description.abstractLink analysis in various forms is now an established technique in many different subjects, reflecting the perceived importance of links and of the Web. A critical but very difficult issue is how to interpret the results of social science link analyses. It is argued that the dynamic nature of the Web, its lack of quality control, and the online proliferation of copying and imitation mean that methodologies operating within a highly positivist, quantitative framework are ineffective. Conversely, the sheer variety of the Web makes application of qualitative methodologies and pure reason very problematic to large-scale studies. Methodology triangulation is consequently advocated, in combination with a warning that the Web is incapable of giving definitive answers to large-scale link analysis research questions concerning social factors underlying link creation. Finally, it is claimed that although theoretical frameworks are appropriate for guiding research, a Theory of Link Analysis is not possible.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112127295/abstracten
dc.subjectLink analysisen
dc.subjectSocial sciencesen
dc.subjectResearch methodsen
dc.subjectAnalytic modelsen
dc.titleInterpreting social science link analysis research: A theoretical frameworken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technologyen
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