2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27182
Title:
The internment of Cahir Healy MP, Brixton Prison 1941-42
Authors:
Norton, Christopher
Abstract:
The arrest and internment in Brixton prison of the leading Northern Ireland nationalist politician and Stormont MP, Cahir Healy, in 1941 has long remained something of an historical enigma. Contemporaneous accounts that his arrest amounted to little more than an unwarranted act of anti-nationalist persecution or was the result of his alleged involvement in ‘acts prejudicial’ during time of war both benefited from the blanket of secrecy that surrounded the case. This article casts light on this affair. It offers an insight into the strategic considerations of Northern nationalist politicians at a time when British victory in the war was uncertain. It argues that some senior nationalist activists, including Healy, did envisage a situation in which British defeat and German victory could bring closer the prospect of Irish unity, did contemplate a policy of cooperation with Germany and did take steps to make this known to the German Legation in Dublin. The article also examines Healy's relationship with fellow internees in Brixton prison and his continued post-war association with figures on the British far-right, particularly Sir Oswald Mosley. (Oxford University Press)
Citation:
Twentieth Century British History, 18(2): 170-193
Publisher:
Oxford: Oxford University Press
Journal:
Twentieth Century British History
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/27182
DOI:
10.1093/tcbh/hwm007
Additional Links:
http://tcbh.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/18/2/170; http://tcbh.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/18/2/170
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
09552359; 14774674
Appears in Collections:
Conflict Studies Research Group ; History

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Christopher-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T19:47:52Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-20T19:47:52Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationTwentieth Century British History, 18(2): 170-193en
dc.identifier.issn09552359-
dc.identifier.issn14774674-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/tcbh/hwm007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27182-
dc.description.abstractThe arrest and internment in Brixton prison of the leading Northern Ireland nationalist politician and Stormont MP, Cahir Healy, in 1941 has long remained something of an historical enigma. Contemporaneous accounts that his arrest amounted to little more than an unwarranted act of anti-nationalist persecution or was the result of his alleged involvement in ‘acts prejudicial’ during time of war both benefited from the blanket of secrecy that surrounded the case. This article casts light on this affair. It offers an insight into the strategic considerations of Northern nationalist politicians at a time when British victory in the war was uncertain. It argues that some senior nationalist activists, including Healy, did envisage a situation in which British defeat and German victory could bring closer the prospect of Irish unity, did contemplate a policy of cooperation with Germany and did take steps to make this known to the German Legation in Dublin. The article also examines Healy's relationship with fellow internees in Brixton prison and his continued post-war association with figures on the British far-right, particularly Sir Oswald Mosley. (Oxford University Press)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford: Oxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://tcbh.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/18/2/170en
dc.relation.urlhttp://tcbh.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/18/2/170en
dc.subjectIrish historyen
dc.subject20th centuryen
dc.subjectHealy, Cahiren
dc.subjectNationalismen
dc.subjectNorthern Irelanden
dc.subjectWorld War Twoen
dc.subjectInternmenten
dc.subjectNational securityen
dc.titleThe internment of Cahir Healy MP, Brixton Prison 1941-42en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalTwentieth Century British Historyen
All Items in WIRE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.